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    Thread: Possible Dangers Of Lucid Dreaming!

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      Exclamation Possible Dangers Of Lucid Dreaming!

      So I was searching around the web and thought I'd Google "dangers of lucid dreaming", and I'd like to show you guys what I've found.



      Possible Dangers Of Lucid Dreaming

      There is no current evidence of lucid dreaming being abnormal or unhealthy in any way. However, there may be some more or less minor side effects associated with having lucid dreams. Please don’t let this scare you away from this trying this; rather, remember that with dreams you are dealing with your own subconscious mind and recklessness is not recommended.


      Addiction
      Lucid dreaming can be used for different purposes. Some may want to try it just for fun, using it as a "safe drug", or a personal virtual reality machine. Having fun is a fully valid application of lucid dreaming. However, be careful not to be addicted to this way of escaping your waking life. If you find that you are spending more time asleep than actually needed, or that you are thinking more about lucid dreams than your real waking life, you might want to consider taking a look at your life: if you're accomplishing the goals you have for yourself, and/or are content with the state of your life, there's likely no cause for alarm. If you see that your life needs work, you might take a break... or, you might use the tools of lucid dreaming to explore what needs to be done in your life.


      Alienation
      Most people have never even heard of lucid dreaming, much less ever experienced it. Some people are also less than open-minded and receptive to new ideas. Don’t be surprised if someone considers this whole phenomenon “weird” or “crazy” (which it is not). Don’t preach, either; you don't have to convince anybody.
      Often people who spontaneously lucid dream, especially children, may find it surprising that not everyone does. They may even start thinking that they are the only people in the world who have lucid dreams. If they’re worried, the best support is to let them know that they’re not alone.


      Dissociation
      Lucid dreaming may weaken the borders between waking and dreaming, the conscious and subconscious mind, reality and fantasy. This might lead to problems of a dissociative nature. Probably the most common form of dissociation involves having problems distinguishing your waking memories from dream memories. Everyone who recalls at least one dream will have to sort out their dreams from reality in the morning. This can really be a problem for those who have previously had zero recall and, due to lucid dreaming, have had a major uptake in recall. Now, suddenly, they have all these excess, illogical memories to sort out. This is unlikely to be a major problem, but may be a big annoyance. An example is when you have actually misplaced an item, and "find it" in a dream. If you cannot distinguish dream from reality you will now think you know where that item is, perhaps even placed it where you felt sure to find it later, but when you awake it will not be there.
      However, there are signs that you should watch for which indicate a larger problem may be developing. Lucid dreaming in itself should not cause these to appear in a waking state:
      Ability to ignore extreme pain or what would normally cause extreme pain
      Absorption in a computer game, television program or movie
      Remembering the past so vividly one seems to be reliving it
      Finding evidence of having done things one can’t remember doing
      Not remembering important events in one’s life
      Being in a familiar place but finding it unfamiliar
      Seeing oneself as if looking at another person
      Other people and objects do not seem real
      Looking at the world through a fog or haze
      Not recognizing friends or family members
      Finding unfamiliar things among one’s belongings
      Finding oneself in a place but unaware of how one got there
      Finding oneself dressed in clothes one doesn’t remember putting on
      If this has happened, and there is no other cause (e.g. drugs), take a break from lucid dreaming for a while. In fact, take a break from anything fictional for a while, at least until symptoms stop. In addition, you may consider avoiding experimentation with lucid dreaming if you have some form of schizophrenia (although very few schizophrenic people admit that they are).

      PLEASE NOTE: The following possibilities are controversial and have not been proven.


      Controversial: Accidentally encountering “spiritual” entities
      This depends on your worldview. If dreams are a creation of your brain and nothing more, you don’t need to worry about spirits or anything similar. If you want to be on the safe side, treating objects in your dream decently and politely won’t do you any harm.
      The book "The Art of Dreaming" by Carlos Castaneda has a lot to say on this subject. (See Further Reading)


      Controversial: Creating bad habits or becoming a control freak
      When lucid dreaming, you have the option to control the dream world in ways that are impossible in the waking world. You can, for example, make objects appear or disappear, or make people act according to your will. Some people believe this may lead your subconscious to desire this kind of control in the waking world, where it’s highly inappropriate. Also, you might be tempted to apply dream-world solutions to waking-life problems instead of actually facing them; for example, just willing bad things to go away or escaping or destroying them by superpowers. Again, this is probably more of a problem if you are not mentally stable at the outset of your dreaming process.


      Controversial: Exhaustion
      Some people believe that experiencing many artificially induced lucid dreams often enough can be very exhausting. The main reason for this phenomenon is the result of the lucid dreams expanding the length of time between REM states. With fewer REMs per night, this state in which you experience actual sleep and your body recovers becomes infrequent enough to become a problem. This is just as exhausting as if you were to wake up every twenty or thirty minutes and watch TV. The effect is dependent on how often your brain attempts to lucidly dream per night. If you enter into a routine of attempting to lucidly dream, you may cause recursive lucid dreams that occur at each state change.


      Controversial: Inability to stop
      If you have trained your mind to the point where it can step over the boundary without conscious effort, you might find it difficult to stop. Do not become alarmed if you have trouble stopping the process of lucid dreaming, it is possible to get out of the habit. As long as you truly expect to stop having lucid dreams regularly, you will. You just need to stop any further attempts to lucid dream, and within a few months the lucid dreaming will go away by itself. Remember; do not be alarmed if, even with your attempts to stop, you experience further lucid dreams. It might take a while to break the habit. If you have real concerns, it may be advisable to talk with your doctor or therapist regarding appropriate treatment, including medication.


      Controversial: Undesirable false awakenings
      One of the advantages of having lucid dreams is being able to change a dream or wake up if things are not turning out as planned. But sometimes, while trying to leave a dream, you'll get "stuck" in a series of false awakenings. A false awakening is when you seem to have woken up but are actually still dreaming. For example, you may find yourself waking up in your room. But once there, new things will start happening—for example, someone might visit, or you might wander outside because of an odd noise, or there might be objects all over the place. Then you might realize you're dreaming, but "wake up" immediately, and the cycle repeats until you eventually do wake up or else dream about something different. This happens mostly with nightmares or when your body is very tired, so your attempts to wake up cause false awakenings. It's a good idea to get in the habit of doing a reality check just after waking up so that you'll realize when this happens and become lucid.
      When this happens repeatedly in the same night, it can be very tiring and often frightening. Not only can the belief of being fully awake in your room while being exposed to unusual situations be scary, but you also may start fearing you won't be able to actually wake up. And, depending on the content of the dream, since all your dreams tend to start in your room, you may fear what could happen once you actually do wake up.
      But this is not a very common situation. Once you are lucid, it is usually easier to wake up or lose the dream than it is to keep dreaming.

      Source:Lucid Dreaming/Introduction - Wikibooks, collection of open-content textbooks

      Hmmm, what do you guys think? I mean, like anything, too much of a "good" thing can be bad.

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      Member Tim_PL's Avatar
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      My opinion (as a qualified psychologist :] ) - a bunch of b***it

      Show me the data, show me statistics, reports, research - then we can discuss
      Sorry, but Wikibooks (especially without direct references to solid literature) is not a reliable source of information.

      If you have no mental disorder, everything is fine. If you do however, then i guess, you are not able to achieve lucid dreaming.

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      My opinion (as a qualified psychologist :] ) - a bunch of b***it

      Show me the data, show me statistics, reports, research - then we can discuss
      Sorry, but Wikibooks (especially without direct references to solid literature) is not a reliable source of information.

      If you have no mental disorder, everything is fine. If you do however, then i guess, you are not able to achieve lucid dreaming.
      Agreed...
      Unless you're mentally ill,there's no risk...
      if there were,I think we'd hear about it...

      The following possibilities are controversial and have not been proven.
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      The truth is that spending too much time on this shit is in fact a "danger" or lucid dreaming.

      It is worth it though. But it still takes up time, which can have negative consequences.

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      Quote Originally Posted by Tim_PL View Post
      My opinion (as a qualified psychologist :] ) - a bunch of b***it

      Show me the data, show me statistics, reports, research - then we can discuss
      Sorry, but Wikibooks (especially without direct references to solid literature) is not a reliable source of information.

      If you have no mental disorder, everything is fine. If you do however, then i guess, you are not able to achieve lucid dreaming.
      Ah, true but there hasn't been any sufficient statistics, reports, and research that proves there's a deity(or deities) yet the majority of society believes in them. I don't want to be gullible but I want to be open minded at the same time. Can I ask why you dismissed Wikibooks without a second thought? Also, where's the statistics, reports, and research that something that is hard cover literature versus online literature is better?
      Has anyone even done a study on whether there ARE negative effects or not? How can we just claim "bull sh*t" if we don't have proof? Well, I don't at least. Do you?

      PS: You're a qualified psychologist? I feel like you're gonna' say "there's somethin' wrong with this kid!" xD

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      Quote Originally Posted by slash112 View Post
      The truth is that spending too much time on this shit is in fact a "danger" or lucid dreaming.

      It is worth it though. But it still takes up time, which can have negative consequences.
      I sorta' think that way too. I feel like...it's too good to be true. Like, there HAS to be a side effect to getting anything you ever imagined even though it's only for the night. Hm, I don't think if it's worth it to me. O_O

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      An open mind means you let anything in regardless of plausibility. An active mind means you assess everything and take responsibility for your assessment.
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      I've never heard of people who have had these problems but I can definitely see where there coming from. I think dissociation and unwanted false awakenings would be the major ones. I had 4 false awakenings in a row one time and on the 4th one I started wondering if I had died but that thought woke me up to the real world. I also read in Lucid Dreaming: Gateway to the Inner Self that Robert Waggoner had 11 false awakenings in a row. Now that would be a trip. Waking up the 7 - 10th time I'd be like fuck is this really happening.

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      Quote Originally Posted by Luciel View Post
      Ah, true but there hasn't been any sufficient statistics, reports, and research that proves there's a deity(or deities) yet the majority of society believes in them.
      Please, don't mix science and religion. It's one of the biggest mistakes. It doesn't bring anything to the discussion. Thank you


      Quote Originally Posted by Luciel View Post
      I don't want to be gullible but I want to be open minded at the same time. Can I ask why you dismissed Wikibooks without a second thought?
      I don't dismiss Wikibooks per se. I just reject sources with have no references to any reliable data. Nothing more.

      Quote Originally Posted by Luciel View Post
      Also, where's the statistics, reports, and research that something that is hard cover literature versus online literature is better?
      The key phrase here is peer review. Whenever scientific study is conducted the results are reported and verified by other scientists. The same goes to books and any kind of publications which are supposed to be scientific. You don't know what are qualifications of the guys behind this article in Wikibooks. If you read research report you are able to verify it. And again - in research report you make references to others sources, researches and observations.

      I can write an article that LD causes deaths. And i know i am right! You can denied that i know i am right!
      Can you see my point?

      Quote Originally Posted by Luciel View Post
      Has anyone even done a study on whether there ARE negative effects or not? How can we just claim "bull sh*t" if we don't have proof? Well, I don't at least. Do you?
      Show me the proof that this article from Wikibooks is based on proofs!

      Quote Originally Posted by Luciel View Post
      PS: You're a qualified psychologist? I feel like you're gonna' say "there's somethin' wrong with this kid!" xD
      There's sth wrong with everyone, LOL!
      Last edited by Tim_PL; 08-26-2010 at 07:08 AM. Reason: A typo: per review -> peer review
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      My lecturer over heard me talking to a friend about Lucid Dreaming. Of course my friend thought the subject was 'weird' and quickly got back to work.
      My lecturer used to work in psychology and she often finds herself talking to her students as if they are patients. Well during this lesson she approached me about lucid dreaming and told me that I was doing it because I want to escape from reality.

      I have actively been Lucid Dreaming for well over a year and a half. The only down side I have had is the inability to talk to my friends about it. Lucid dreaming is relatively unknown and most people assume I am making it up or something.

      Although, thank god for Inception. Hopefully this will open up peoples minds.

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      I hate to be part of the "I call BS" group....but I call BS.

      I don't know about you, but I would KILL to be unable to stop. And I'd kill to have FA after FA. For those of you that know him, that's how Walms gets 99% of his LDs. If you have dissociation, well, it's not Lucid Dreaming's fault. I'd say you have a deeper, bigger, underlying issue. Applying dream-world solution to real life ones? Again, an underlying issue with you. Exhaustion? If that was the case, then the Naturals wouldn't make it through the day. As for addiction, well, I'm not complaining. There's never too much of a good thing in my book. Not to mention that in the last part of the FA section it's almost promoting waking up after getting lucid! XP

      Yep...BS.

      /rant

      To me the only true, REAL, negative side-effect is Lucid Dreaming is.....

      Spoiler for Negative:
      Loss of sleep. WBTBs and WILDs come with a price.
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      Quote Originally Posted by Tim_PL View Post
      The key phrase here is per review.

      Show me the proof that this article from Wikibooks is based on proofs!
      Actually its peer review.

      There are many good, noble, and interesting ideas which are not based on proof. Although a bit alarmist, anyone reading the above wiki books statement can evaluate the truth in them for themselves. They are merely covering their bases.

      I find most of it indeed to be B.S. for myself, but I am sure there are less stable types out there who I cannot vouch for....
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      Quote Originally Posted by Snowy Egypt View Post
      I hate to be part of the "I call BS" group....but I call BS.

      I don't know about you, but I would KILL to be unable to stop. And I'd kill to have FA after FA. For those of you that know him, that's how Walms gets 99% of his LDs. If you have dissociation, well, it's not Lucid Dreaming's fault. I'd say you have a deeper, bigger, underlying issue. Applying dream-world solution to real life ones? Again, an underlying issue with you. Exhaustion? If that was the case, then the Naturals wouldn't make it through the day. As for addiction, well, I'm not complaining. There's never too much of a good thing in my book. Not to mention that in the last part of the FA section it's almost promoting waking up after getting lucid! XP

      Yep...BS.

      /rant

      To me the only true, REAL, negative side-effect is Lucid Dreaming is.....

      Spoiler for Negative:
      Loss of sleep. WBTBs and WILDs come with a price.
      I HATE FAs, personally they creep me out.. And to me, are the least preferable way of having LDs...

      I think most of the points made in the post aren't really problems.. I do believe the memory thing is annoying, cos I get that alot of the time..

      But the rest, are either crap or not truly negative points...
      "Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere." – Albert Einstein.

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      Flying squirrels FTW!!! Snowy Egypt's Avatar
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      Not trying to be rude or anything, but how do FAs creep you out? I really am curious. You're not the 1st person I've seen that's said the same thing, and every time I think, "Hmm...I wonder why...".
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      IMO, this is a load of bull.

      For starters, none of these have to do with me, or frighten me, and I've had loads of lucid dreams, been doing it for almost a year...

      I'm sure dissociation (and similar problems) only arises if the person's unable to distinguish normal dreams from reality in the first place. Unless they have some bigger underlying psychological problem. Unless the person's very fragile, and want to escape from reality due to depression, etcetera, addiction won't be a problem. Lucid dreams don't change a thing about REM, your brain's just conscious while you're dreaming. There's no true biological effects. And false awakenings are a good opportunity to LD. The positives far outweigh the "risks" posted, and there's no need to even post them because the person should really know, from common sense, what the risks are if they're mentally unstable or such.
      Last edited by Puffin; 08-29-2010 at 03:35 AM.

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      I'm gonna go with the majority here, and say that for the most part, the article is complete bogus. The only potentially valid point, which it uses to extend over several negatives, is that of obsession - and that point can apply to anything. Of course if you become obsessed with lucid dreaming, or anything for that matter, such that it negatively impacts the rest of your life, there's a problem. However, I can't imagine any circumstance where lucid dreaming would be the cause of that problem - there would almost have to be some underlying, probably unrelated issue. But that's just my thoughts.
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      Quote Originally Posted by Snowy Egypt View Post
      Not trying to be rude or anything, but how do FAs creep you out? I really am curious. You're not the 1st person I've seen that's said the same thing, and every time I think, "Hmm...I wonder why...".
      In all my FAs, I've woken up in the last place I remember seeing.. A dark room..

      And, I hate the dark.. My mind's always conjuring up crap, that's scares the living daylights out of me..

      Not to mention, that dreaded feeling I got when I had my first LUCID FA... I woke up, then BAM became Lucid.. But it just didn't feel good, and it gave me goosebumps.. It was probably because it was scarily real, and the fact that I could easily mistake it for my reality, *Shudder*..

      Anyways, I know I'm probably just being a wuss, but meh..
      "Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere." – Albert Einstein.

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      Quote Originally Posted by PXUmais View Post
      Not to mention, that dreaded feeling I got when I had my first LUCID FA... I woke up, then BAM became Lucid.. But it just didn't feel good, and it gave me goosebumps.. It was probably because it was scarily real, and the fact that I could easily mistake it for my reality, *Shudder*..

      Anyways, I know I'm probably just being a wuss, but meh..
      I'm sure lots of people have experienced that feeling, including myself. It's creepy knowing that it's your room (usually), but you're actually in a dream where anything can happen. But hey, it's a dream, so go fly or something!

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      You can become addicted to anything, and I don't see why people would want to use dreams to "escape" from their lives. Sounds kind of ridiculous, imo.

      I just personally just do it because it's a fun hobby on the side. I love my life, and lucid dreaming hasn't caused me to appreciate it any less (actually, it improved my life even more).
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      I have to agree that almost any negative effect from lucid dreaming would likely have some other underlying cause. As for FAs, I used to be afraid of them as normally it was my house and room but something just felt terribly wrong though everything looked fine. However the last time I felt this was about eight years ago, when I found lucid dreaming. Now I use that bad feeling as a trigger to realize it is time to do a reality check.
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      Quote Originally Posted by PXUmais View Post
      In all my FAs, I've woken up in the last place I remember seeing.. A dark room..

      And, I hate the dark.. My mind's always conjuring up crap, that's scares the living daylights out of me..

      Not to mention, that dreaded feeling I got when I had my first LUCID FA... I woke up, then BAM became Lucid.. But it just didn't feel good, and it gave me goosebumps.. It was probably because it was scarily real, and the fact that I could easily mistake it for my reality, *Shudder*..

      Anyways, I know I'm probably just being a wuss, but meh..
      Well if you RC when you wake up and you find out your LD'ing, then you can conjure up something else. If not, then its pretty easy to fall back asleep. I personally love FA's. the last 2 LD's I had were cause of them.

      But back on topic, I believe all that danger stuff is sorta like the placebo effect. If you believe hard enough that your gonna mix things up between the waking and the dream world, then you will.
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      For a Newbie this is seriously making me have doubts about having Lucid dreaming. I mean it seems awesome but what the op had to say was a little startling. Considering the side effects I may just back off from this for a moment.

      These are a few of the side effect that were startling

      Not remembering important events in one’s life

      I don't want to forget things. Let alone important ones.

      Being in a familiar place but finding it unfamiliar

      Wow that bit unnerving.

      Seeing oneself as if looking at another person

      Could this be a sign of someone going crazy?

      Other people and objects do not seem real

      See above

      Looking at the world through a fog or haze

      whoa I don't want to be me.

      I really hope am over exaggerating about this because the comments above really is putting to rest. Hope their right.

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      Ergh, dream recall improves your memory. It helps you create mental "links" between events that you normally wouldn't process at all. In lucid dreaming, when you try to remember tasks (ie: TotM) you came up with while awake, you stimulate parts of the brain that you usually don't even use.

      If anything, the process involved in becoming a lucid dreamer makes you more aware of the waking world, not less. The technique that I use to DILD involves taking note of the "feeling" of the dream. Just by thinking about it, I can tell whether I'm dreaming or awake, which, in turn, makes me more lucid/aware/alert/conscious/alive while I actually am awake.

      I agree with Tim. This article is utter bullshit, written by someone who doesn't know the difference between speculative fiction and reality. Also, source?
      Last edited by Samael; 08-29-2010 at 05:42 AM.
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      lol, that list is for wuss pep.. ohhh noo pleasee... falsee a weakeningg.. im gonna die.. call 911 ohhh noo pep think im craxyy cause i lucid dream!!!
      naa just kidding... but really.. thas lamee
      Psionik likes this.

    25. #25
      Imaginer X DreamerForever Achievements:
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