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    1. #1
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      The effects of sleep deprivation on sleep stages

      Hello
      I was wondering if anyone knows how sleep deprivation (let's say 36 hours without sleep) affects sleep stages. What I mean is: what will happen once I finally go to sleep? I've heard that for the first couple of hours REM will not kick in in favor of NREM. Could this be advantageous to WILDing? I'd get my 6 hours of sleep, none of which would waste REM for me, wake up and stay awake, and then attempt WILDing.
      It sound logical, but is that thing about skipping REM in the first cycles true? Does anyone have any information about that? Sleep deprivation is a pretty fascinating subject.
      Thanks.

    2. #2
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      I rode in Daniel Love'book "are you dreaming" that when you had a poor sleep quality the previous night (youy didn't slept enough, or if you ate chocolate or cafein) then the brain will compensate the next night, by occuring more REM stages.
      If you don't sleep for a while, then the brain will fall directly in deep sleep for a long state.
      Good sleep quality = good recall.
      Also try to drink a beer before going to bed, alchool tend to avoid REM stages in the first part of the night (the first 4 hours), then compensate at the end of the night.
      Personally I'm trying this today, and because last night I slept only few hours, so I'm conviced that tonight I will generate more REM than usual.
      Last edited by Gusto; 06-22-2015 at 07:28 PM.

    3. #3
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      Quote Originally Posted by Gusto View Post
      If you don't sleep for a while, then the brain will fall directly in deep sleep for a long state.
      So that supports what I've heard, I guess: no sleep = only NREM for the first few hours.

      Quote Originally Posted by Gusto View Post
      Also try to drink a beer before going to bed, alchool tend to avoid REM stages in the first part of the night (the first 4 hours), then compensate at the end of the night.
      Personally I'm trying this today, and because last night I slept only few hours, so I'm conviced that tonight I will generate more REM than usual.
      I don't think one beer would do it You'd have to be pretty buzzed for alcohol to affect your REM. Either way, not the way to go for me.

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      I feel like, and seem to remember, that with a lack of sleep you actually go into REM in a lot less time than usual upon falling asleep, with REM cycles that are longer and closer together with less NREM in between. I don't have any articles or sources handy at the moment to back that up, though you might search for “REM rebound” and check that out.

    5. #5
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      Quote Originally Posted by Travis E. View Post
      I feel like, and seem to remember, that with a lack of sleep you actually go into REM in a lot less time than usual upon falling asleep, with REM cycles that are longer and closer together with less NREM in between. I don't have any articles or sources handy at the moment to back that up, though you might search for “REM rebound” and check that out.
      We have to understand that 'lack of sleep' can mean two different things: not getting enough sleep over a certain period of time (sleeping 4-5 hours instead of your regular 8-9), and being awake for a prolonged period of time (like 48 hours with no sleep). I really do have to get some facts straight, because I feel like I try to find out what makes sense instead of really working on solid facts (although in case of dreaming, and lucid at that, there isn't much of that).
      But getting back to the point. When I said 'sleep deprivation' I meant being awake non-stop for much more than we are used to. The omission of REM applies to this type of thing (or so I've heard). I think that when you are not getting enough sleep (but some, nonetheless) and later you are finally able to sleep however long you want, then the REM rebound occurs. If you have gone 2 days without sleep it's logical for your body to assume you've been working hard (or running after game) and repairing your body gets prioritized over dreaming. But I might be wrong.
      Last edited by Radek; 06-25-2015 at 04:12 PM.

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