• Lucid Dreaming - Dream Views




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    Nerefa

    1. The Root of Dream Control

      by , 07-08-2022 at 06:59 PM
      My concept of lucidity has changed drastically in the past 1-2 years. I see this same change in many other people and it explains a lot of dream control issues. Most newbies figure this out a lot sooner than I did. A lot of naturals are in the same boat as me.

      I used to understand that I was dreaming, but didn't fully grasp the implications. Sure, I knew it was a dream and that I was asleep in bed, but I didn't fully understand what a dream was. This changed everything about what lucidity meant for me.

      I viewed it as something inward and of the mind, sure, but more involuntary and disconnected from myself. I was under the false assumption that one's subconscious dreams and dream psychology is consequential rather than influential. The dream was the RESULT of my psyche. This was wrong.

      Dreams are an actively changing, growing, and living manifestation of your thoughts and feelings. Once you realize this, being lucid carries a whole new understanding about your control over dreams. This is essentially the "Aha!" moment I had when I achieved ultimate dream control.

      It took me over 20 years to figure this out. A lot of people get it way earlier on haha.
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    2. Lunar's Daytime Awareness Guide

      by , 07-05-2022 at 08:15 PM
      What is Daytime Practice?
      Daytime awareness practice for lucid dreaming refers to the practice of becoming aware of whether you are awake or dreaming during the day. By doing this regularly throughout the day, you train a habit of becoming aware in dreams. As a result, you become lucid in your dreams.

      ADA, SAT, DILD hooks, and Reality Checks are examples of day practices that share the same awareness fundamentals. You can do these by themselves to get lucid dreams, or pair them with techniques such as MILD and WILD.


      What is ADA and SAT?
      ADA stands for All Day Awareness and is the practice of being aware of whether or not you are dreaming constantly throughout the day.

      SAT stands for Sporadic Awareness Technique and is the same as ADA, but an easier version of it. Instead of awareness being constant, you can simply be aware sporadically (randomly) in moments throughout the day. You can still gain a high rate of lucitity by doing SAT whenever you remember to do it.

      What is awraness, though?
      Awareness means you know something or are perceiving something. You can be aware of anything, such as that you're reading this guide, that the sky is blue, or that you're sitting in a chair. You are constantly aware of many things all at once, both in your environment and in your mind.

      With daytime awareness practices for the purpose of lucid dreaming, there is only one thing you need to be aware of: are you awake or dreaming? You don't need to be aware of the sky or your feelings, only this one question. To do awareness practices, ask yourself this question.

      But how do I ask myself if I'm awake or dreaming?
      To do SAT, earnestly ask yourself this question: "Am I dreaming or awake?" There are three possible answers.

      1. "No, I am awake." The waking experience is the easiest to identify. This is something many lucid dreamers learn on their own through experience, but I will tell you right here from the get-go: you know most easily when you're awake.

      2. The next possible answer is "Yes, I am dreaming." If you're doing reality checks, be mindful of whether you're already at the "yes" answer, as you don't need to complicate it with a reality check. You're already lucid.

      3. The third and most game-changing answer is "Maybe." Many people use reality checks here, but it's not necessary due to a funny little secret about lucid dreaming: maybe means yes.

      Any time you're asking yourelf if this is all a dream, you're probably dreaming. We don't get earnest maybes when we're awake like we do with dreams. This might be due to how memory works in dreams, since you don't always have access to all of your usual waking memory—the very thing that causes non-lucidity to begin with. The way dream brain makes you uncertain of your reality is itself a clue that you're dreaming.

      By being aware of your own uncertainty and being critical of what your uncertainty means, you become lucid in dreams.


      What are reality checks?
      Reality checks confirm whether you are in a dream by being critical of things in your environment. For example: if you look at your hands, they will look normal when awake, but you could have an impossible number of fingers in your dreams.

      There are many different kinds of reality checks that all do the same thing (pushing a finger through your palm, trying to breathe through your nose while plugging it, etc.)

      Reality checks are commonly used and highly effective, but it's hpful to understand that what makes them so effective is the awareness and criticality behind them, not the check itself. The check itself does not cause lucidity, but is a way to confirm lucidity. Because you can practice awareness and criticality without reality checks, they are an optional additional step.


      Reminders & Timers
      Daytime awareness practices should not involve setting timers or alarms to remind yourself to be aware, since you won't be able to use those in your dreams. If the timer you set doesn't go off in your dreams, you won't know to do it and you won't become lucid.

      Sure, you could set yourself up to dream about an alarm going off, but there is a much easier and more effective way of reminding yourself to do SAT in dreams: enter DILD hooks.

      What is a DILD hook?
      DILD stands for Dream Initiated Lucid Dream, which means that you become lucid at some point in your dream. Any technique that's not WILD is technically DILD, so ADA/SAT is also technically a form of DILD. The "hook" is the reminder part.

      DILD hooking is the same thing as SAT, but with a reminder. The reminder/hook must be something that occurs in both your waking life and dreams (usually not phone reminders, timers, or alarms).

      For example, if you dream about dragons often, you can train yourself to do SAT every time you encounter something related to dragons in waking life (doesn't need to be an actual dragon, just the idea of one). By training yourself to remember to do SAT every time you think of dragons, you can become lucid frequently in your dreams whenever dragons appear—especially if you train the criticality behind recognizing that living dragons only exist in dreams.

      Realistic Hooks
      DILD hooks can also be realistic or mundane things like cats, bananas, certain family members, seeing the sky, or the simple act of moving. As long as the hook occurs in your dreams, it can work as a reminder to do SAT.

      As described above, you don't need a reality check (like a dragon) to do SAT—all you need is to mindfully ask yourself if you're dreaming and be aware of the three possible answers. This is why realistic DILD hooks work.

      Emotions can also be DILD hooks. Children who become lucid from nightmares (a frequent backstory of natural lucid dreamers) unknowingly do DILD hooks by training an association between feelings of fear, and questioning their reality. Negative emotion is an ideal DILD hook if your goal is to stop nightmares with lucid dreaming. It can be trained deliberately by practicing daytime awareness every time you experience the negative emotion in your waking life, even if just from harmless exposure such as watching a scary/unpleasant movie.


      Frequently Asked Questions

      Q: I thought you were supposed to pay attention to details in your environment for ADA? Like details in the grass, eye movements, the feeling of clothing, etc.
      A: This is fine as long as you're practicing awareness and criticality. If you only pay attention to details in your environment without being aware and critical of whether you're awake/dreaming, you will likely trigger more detailed dreams, but not necessarily lucid ones.

      Q: I can't find guides on SAT, only ADA?
      A: Because ADA and SAT are the same (other than how much you you do them), guides for ADA and SAT are interchangible. As long as you keep in mind that SAT is the sporadic version of ADA, you can use guides for both. It is a matter of All Day VS Spodic timing of your awareness, but otherwise they are the same practice.

      Q: I still don't understand what awareness is.
      A: If you read this guide and still don't understand what it means to be aware, you might be overthinking it. Are you awake right now? If so, then you're aware that you're awake. If you've ever had a lucid dream before, you were aware that you were dreaming. Bingo! Now you got it! Go do more of that.

      Q: What is the "most effective" DILD hook?
      A: Effectiveness is higher for things you dream frequently about. Also, things with an emotional impact also seem to be extra effective.

      Q: I can't remember any dreams. How do I know what happens frequently in my dreams for a DILD hook?
      A: For this, I recommend either doing SAT without a DILD hook, or using a common DILD hook (like the sky, something you most likely are dreaming about but just can't remember). Also, you need to work on your recall, otherwise you may not remember any future lucid dreams you have.
      Here's my recall guide: https://www.dreamviews.com/blogs/ner...l-guide-94405/

      Updated 07-06-2022 at 02:49 AM by 99032

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