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    Thread: Dream emotions, states of mind, drugs? This is confusing

    1. #1
      Member BohmaN's Avatar
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      Dream emotions examined

      The following thoughts have been on my mind for a while now. Let me explain (I'll be hard, but I shall try my best):

      Some background info:
      When you dream (doesn't have to be lucidly), it's well known that you are emotionally inhibited and thus experience intense and often rapid shifts of emotions. A feeling cannot be aroused without a neurochemical alteration in the brain (at least in reality, but more about that below).

      For example: Taking LSD within a dream... I've tried it like 4-5 times. It's a wicked insane experience, sometimes so overwealming that I wake up. Nevertheless, what makes me feel what I feel? There is no change in brain chemistry obviously, since then the effects would be carried out into the real world once awakened from the dream. So what is going on here really?

      Here's where it gets pretty strange... Sometimes the emotions are carried out into the real world, like when you wake up from a nightmare or have a very exciting dream, you can wake up with the exact same feelings more or less. But other times, especially when I take a drug in a dream, the effects stop suddenly as you awaken. A physical change in your body has thus not occured.

      Emotions can be short lived but very intense. What makes them appear in the first place? It's like ghost-emotions.

      I have the following two theories:
      1. Are you in your dream, able to go past brain chemistry and float around freely at the very core of your emotional mind (how that would work, I have no idea).

      2. Or are you stimulating your brain AS THOUGH the neurotransmittors where actually there. Like some kind synaps self-stimulation, which would explain the sudden loss of your state of mind as you awaken.

      Ghost-feelings are mysterious to me.

      And why are you SOMETIMES having feelings normally?? The ones that are carried out into waking life as it takes some time for your brain chemistry to get back to normal (it "lags" a bit, since it is a physical change that needs to settle, even though the "danger is over" so to speak (if it was a nightmare)).

      In your dream, your normal feelings are like the "background feelings", like a thick synth pad or something, and the "ghost-feelings" are more like short attack/release high pitched synths. Does this make any sense?
      Last edited by BohmaN; 03-08-2010 at 12:42 AM. Reason: More appropriate topic
      Currently practicing WILD. I quote Kaniaz who said it best: "The point of WILD is to piss me off". Though, I have not given up, far from it.

    2. #2
      Conflagration Engines Logos's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by BohmaN View Post
      In your dream, your normal feelings are like the "background feelings", like a thick synth pad or something, and the "ghost-feelings" are more like short attack/release high pitched synths. Does this make any sense?
      What an amazing illustration. I work with music DAWs and can relate to that simile. I have 'taken' hallucinogens in my dreams several times, and usually it precludes my becoming lucid.

      I have often wondered about 'ghost' feelings myself, but I think if you look at this universe as a manifestation of consciousness or light, it becomes a little more understandable.

      In my opinion, our physical brains are made of the same amalgamate matter as any other object in the universe, and therefore the unique element is our mind. What we perceive is entirely up to us in the waking world, as well as in dreams, so it may not be that the chemical dictates the 'trip', but the perception/acceptance of the drug that allows the chemical state to occur.

      Hope this helps,
      ~L
      BohmaN likes this.

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      Member BohmaN's Avatar
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      I have often wondered about 'ghost' feelings myself, but I think if you look at this universe as a manifestation of consciousness or light, it becomes a little more understandable.
      It does and it's actually the closest at hand at the moment, even though it's quite mysterious.

      so it may not be that the chemical dictates the 'trip', but the perception/acceptance of the drug that allows the chemical state to occur.
      Yeah but still this is weird. Your brain cannot just turn into a certain state without the chemical, or can it? Isn't it the chemical itself that IS the state?

      Or could it be that our expectations BECOMES the chemical, energetically, and alone shaping a state of mind. Could be...
      Currently practicing WILD. I quote Kaniaz who said it best: "The point of WILD is to piss me off". Though, I have not given up, far from it.

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      There's not a lot of traction to be gained talking about imagination in mechanistic/chemical terms, just because so little is known. Are you in any way simulating the chemical effects of LSD in the brain? No, almost certainly not. Are you experiencing a state far beyond what could be induced in or carried over to the waking mind? Oh yeah.

      The difference, however, may not be in your brain at all; you may produce the same or roughly the same brain state while awake, but experience it far differently because of the mitigating effects of perceiving and being in contact with a more robust reality. It's like the sound of water dripping onto a hard surface; in a closed and darkened room, it can take over your whole consciousness, but amid the crowd on a subway platform you wouldn't hear it, or wouldn't know you hear it, at all. In your waking life, perhaps whatever serotonin vibrato produces your dream "trips" would be experienced as a momentary tightening of the chest, a passing sense of beauty quickly buried in the rush of sense and contact all around you.
      If you have a sense of caring for others, you will manifest a kind of inner strength in spite of your own difficulties and problems. With this strength, your own problems will seem less significant and bothersome to you. By going beyond your own problems and taking care of others, you gain inner strength, self-confidence, courage, and a greater sense of calm.Dalai Lama



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      Member BohmaN's Avatar
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      The difference, however, may not be in your brain at all; you may produce the same or roughly the same brain state while awake, but experience it far differently because of the mitigating effects of perceiving and being in contact with a more robust reality. It's like the sound of water dripping onto a hard surface; in a closed and darkened room, it can take over your whole consciousness, but amid the crowd on a subway platform you wouldn't hear it, or wouldn't know you hear it, at all. In your waking life, perhaps whatever serotonin vibrato produces your dream "trips" would be experienced as a momentary tightening of the chest, a passing sense of beauty quickly buried in the rush of sense and contact all around you.
      That's interesting. You're saying that when I imagine the effects of LSD in real life, the feeling is there, but I cannot sense it due to the sensation being completely drowned in the "noise" of your senses, thoughts, feelings and state of mind. While dreaming, this noise is greatly reduced. Taking this into account with the fact that you're more imaginative and creative in your dreams, would explain the effect on one level. It doesn't, as you say, really adress the core issue (which is, what is really happening in your brain in this state of high imagination, and how?). I'm not suprised little is known... My theories seem to be the only possibilities as I see it though (call me humble xD).
      Currently practicing WILD. I quote Kaniaz who said it best: "The point of WILD is to piss me off". Though, I have not given up, far from it.

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