• Lucid Dreaming - Dream Views




    Results 1 to 9 of 9
    1. #1
      Master of Logic Achievements:
      1 year registered 5000 Hall Points Made Friends on DV Referrer Bronze Veteran First Class
      Kromoh's Avatar
      Join Date
      Feb 2007
      Gender
      Location
      Some rocky planet with water
      Posts
      3,993
      Likes
      86

      Chapter 3: The aspects of dreaming

      This is the initial revision of the third chapter in the book: The aspects of dreaming.

      Feel free to discuss, propose or post changes to it. Do, however, put new/edited text in a different colour, so to make comparison easier. Finally, you could [[add notes to the piece by using brackets]].

      Note that this thread is for discussion about the 3rd chapter only: for general discussion about the book, check this thread. You might also want to see the Project Sketch, for information on the plans for the project.

      Note to all writers: make sure you include the copyright at every book file you create. This is just to prevent material leaks.

      -----
      Chapter 3: The aspects of dreaming

      Before we plunge into the vast study of lucid dreaming it is important to understand some principles of the sleeping cycle, and of dreaming itself. The use of this may not be readily apparent to you, but the knowledge will help in all aspects including dream recall and the timing of various techniques.

      Most dream and sleep research is conducted through the use of an electroencephalogram (EEG). This machine gives off distinctive rhythms, or waves, of resting neurons. From these waves, different stages of sleep were classified. The sleep cycle, as it is called, has been thoroughfully studied, and as of now many concepts are agreed between scientists. The following is the complete cycle the body goes through approximately every seventy to ninety minutes of sleep.





      In stage one, which means soon after falling asleep, you slip into a light unconsciousness, which lasts about ten minutes, during which brain activity follows a theta wave pattern. At this time, your brain activity will be akin to a calm and relaxed waking mind.

      In stage two the EEG shows a change from theta waves into the slower beta waves. The body’s functions will progressively slow, though a sleeper can easily be woken by sounds.

      Stage three is the beginning of deep sleep. This stage occurs after about thirty to forty-five minutes of sleep. Brain activity has slowed into a delta wave pattern. It can be somehow hard to wake someone up when he or she is sleeping at this stage; and when it is done, the sleeper might wake up confused and disorientated.

      Soon this will shift into stage four, the deepest sleep. Bodily functions decline in deep physical rest and delta waves are over fifty percent. During this stage, waking up the sleeper may prove extremely hard.

      After stage four ends you will gradually move up the stages, eventually entering stage one emergent, or more commonly known as REM (rapid eye movement) sleep. Here the treasures of the subconscious are unearthed. You guessed it0- dreams. During REM your breathing is irregular, your eyes have bursts of movement and your pulse rate. At this point your body has come under a sleep paralysis that relaxes your muscles and ceases motor messages sent by your brain. This is thought to be for preventing involuntary movements that could get your sleeping-self hurt. Some of you may have experienced this phenomena, waking to find you are unable to move at all; while experiencing a tingling or electric sensation through your body. Sleep paralysis prevents all your major muscles from moving, thus allowing you to move your dreaming body, while having your physical body perfectly safe and still.

      This first dream period may last a short ten minutes, after which you will go through the sleep cycle over again from stage 2. Fortunately as the night goes on stage three and four vanish, leaving REM periods longer (eventually up to an hour) and the time between them shorter.

      Knowing how the sleep cycle works has many advantages when inducing lucid dreaming. Some techniques will rely on this information, as will be seen on the related chapters.

      The study of dreams is something that has always challenged the boundaries of human knowledge. It is not easy to study what happens during sleep, science most of it is unconscious. Dreaming itself was not scientifically proven until recently. Theses can be made, however, based on the psychological views of dreaming.

      Based on Stephen LaBerge, Ph.D.’s discoveries, it was possible to study the nature and reason behind dreaming.

      In our daily lives, our brain maintains a mental image of our body, an updated set of information, regarding the position we are in, what we see and hear, if we are hungry, and several other data important to our survival. This body image is what allows us to close our eyes, and still know where our arms are placed. During sleep, however, the situation changes: the sensorial input our brain retrieves from our body is so little, that our mind has trouble to work out where we are or what we are doing, correctly. In its struggle to depurate our current situation, based on the scarce information it has, our mind will often produce a whole mental conception of the scenario around us. But, since it is based on such ambiguous and limited information, it will often create a wrong scenario around us: a scenario we are not in at the moment. That’s when dreaming starts.

      Being under the effects of Sleep Paralysis, which will prevent any major movement from our muscles, our mind is able to displace the mental image of the body, while our real body is lying still, immobile. For our brain, it is as if we were moving, when in fact, we aren’t moving at all.

      This situation opens up a wide gamma of possibilities. When our mental body image does not correspond to our physical body situation, we start to dream: the world then seen is not the real one, but one designed by our minds. The laws of physics do not limit that world: it will be a world in which anything we believe is possible. Dreams often carry a sense of freedom: our dream selves are able to do the impossible, from flying without wings to seeing people who are no longer with us.

      Dreams do indeed offer the possibility to do whatever we want, but even though it will be affected by our beliefs, knowledge and experiences. For an example of that, read the following story:

      John walked down the street. On his way to school, he found a dog. He instantly remembered his own dog: a playful Yorkshire. When he finally got to his school, he met many of his friends.

      Assumptions, be them conscious or subconscious, ruled the way you interpreted the meaning of that small paragraph. You imagined, highly likely, that John walked with his legs, and not with his hands. You might have also assumed that the dog John found was walking on the street, and not driving a car. You probably also concluded that John wasn’t accompanied by his dog at the moment he walked to school. Finally, you might have imagined John’s friends as humans, rather than whales.

      This story was used to explain the assumptions you make throughout your existence. Your brain uses those to deduce meaning faster from situations, speech, and text. These assumptions can be conscious or unconscious. It is completely normal for a person to assume a lot from what he or she reads.
      When dealing with dreaming, however, assumptions play an even more important role. Most people would never expect to see a frog watching soap opera on a couch. For that reason, then, chances are they’ll never dream of that. That is explained by your assumptions. In a dream, only things that you believe can happen will happen. This can, though, be pushed by your experiences, such as seeing a talking dog on television, and subconsciously believing it is possible. In those cases, then, dreaming of a talking dog is rather likely.


      The schemas that rule our way of thinking in waking life are also present when dreaming. Everything that happens in a dream happens because your mind expects it to happen. If you believe, for example, that broccoli tastes awful, then it’s highly likely to taste the same in a dream.
      Our beliefs can also be bad, especially for lucid dreaming. In our daily lives, we don’t ever ask ourselves if we are dreaming. That is, of course, because in light of consciousness, we don’t expect to be dreaming. Not expecting to be dreaming will make you believe the same thing when you are indeed in a dream. Your subconscious will carry that belief, making you not question the world around you. For that reason, even the most absurd situations will sound completely usual to us, in a dream: we don’t expect to be dreaming, after all.
      For that matter, there is a type of lucid dream induction that bases exactly on that. Dreams, as made by our mind, will often contain inaccuracies, rather unlikely or even impossible situations. Even in the most vivid of the dreams, some things will accuse it as being a dream. One example would be a flying dog, or finding your bedroom is now pink (if it wasn’t already). These indicators are called dream signs, for, upon seeing one, one can question whether if he is facing reality, or just experiencing a dream. This kind of realization can make that person lucid, by becoming aware that what he sees is only inside his dreaming mind. It goes without mention that this realization is only possible if you expect you could be in a dream.
      Now that you know how dreams work, you can move on to the first concepts of lucid dreaming. On the next chapter, you will see exactly that: the aspects of a dream, its comparison to reality, and how you can use those to induce lucid dreams. Apart from that, it also includes the main concepts and characteristics of a lucid dream.

      © Copyright 2007 Dreamviews education team. All rights reserved.
      Last edited by Kromoh; 10-06-2007 at 01:52 AM.
      ~Kromoh

      Saying quantum physics explains cognitive processes is just like saying geology explains jurisprudence.

    2. #2
      Boom! Achievements:
      Referrer Bronze 1 year registered Veteran First Class 5000 Hall Points
      Sugarglider11's Avatar
      Join Date
      Oct 2006
      Gender
      Location
      under your bed haha Posts: -134
      Posts
      1,012
      Likes
      2
      Ok this made me laugh, but it makes sense

      Assumptions, be them conscious or subconscious, ruled the way you interpreted the meaning of that small paragraph. You imagined, highly likely, that John walked with his legs, and not with his hands. You might have also assumed that the dog John found was walking on the street, and not driving a car. You probably also concluded that John wasnít accompanied by his dog at the moment he walked to school. Finally, you might have imagined Johnís friends as humans, rather than whales.

      are the other chapter going to be longer than this, because so we need a lot more.

      ^Probably

      Join the Lucid dreaming book project!

    3. #3
      Master of Logic Achievements:
      1 year registered 5000 Hall Points Made Friends on DV Referrer Bronze Veteran First Class
      Kromoh's Avatar
      Join Date
      Feb 2007
      Gender
      Location
      Some rocky planet with water
      Posts
      3,993
      Likes
      86
      well sugarglider, I intend to expand a bit both on this and on the first one, but I jus tlack creativity for now... I wrote a lot at school today
      ~Kromoh

      Saying quantum physics explains cognitive processes is just like saying geology explains jurisprudence.

    4. #4
      ıpǝɾǝɔɹnos
      Join Date
      Mar 2007
      Location
      PNZ
      Posts
      387
      Likes
      0
      I've just found the strikethrough button :-), so I'm using it to mark removals. I'm also underlining inserts.

      For convenience I recommend investing in a browser spell-checker (OK, downloading one for free :-). Try firefox - you might have to download a US english dictionary too. Firefox on my computer lets you choose the spell checker language for each text area, you can ask it to run a spell-check, and it does the misspelled-words-underlined-in-wavy-red thing too.

      Again, this is mostly a gentle correction, where the original isn't quite correct English, but I can tell what the intention was. Hopefully it makes the text clearer, and the actual ideas and higher level structure easier to review.

      I'm loving the sleep chart! Would be nice to know where the "stage 1 emergent" for REM comes from. Wikipedia calls it "stage 5", which is what I expected, or "stage R". "Stage 1 emergent" makes a lot of sense, but I'd like to know it's not just something someone made up and that other people do actually use it :-).

      -----
      Chapter 3: The aspects of dreaming

      Before we plunge into the vast study of lucid dreaming it is important to understand some principles of the sleeping cycle, and of dreaming itself. The use of this may not be readily apparent to you, but the knowledge will help in all aspects including dream recall and the timing of various techniques.

      Most dream and sleep research is conducted through the use of an electroencephalogram (EEG). This machine gives off distinctive rhythms, or waves, of resting neurons. From these waves, different stages of sleep were classified. The sleep cycle, as it is called, has been thoroughfully thoroughly studied, and as of now many concepts are agreed between scientists. The following is the complete cycle the body goes through approximately every seventy to ninety minutes of sleep.





      In stage one, which means soon after falling asleep, you slip into a state of light unconsciousness which lasts about ten minutes, during which brain activity follows a theta wave pattern. At this time, your brain activity will be akin to a calm and relaxed waking mind.

      In stage two the EEG shows a change from theta waves into the slower beta waves. The body’s functions will progressively slow, though a sleeper can easily be woken by sounds.

      Stage three is the beginning of deep sleep. This stage occurs after about thirty to forty-five minutes of sleep. Brain activity has slowed into a delta wave pattern. It can be somehow hard to wake someone up when he or she is sleeping at this stage; and when it is done, the sleeper might wake up confused and disorientated.

      Soon this will shift into stage four, the deepest sleep. Bodily functions decline in deep physical rest and delta waves are over fifty percent. During this stage, waking up the sleeper may prove extremely hard.

      After stage four ends you will gradually move up the stages, eventually entering stage one emergent, or more commonly known as REM (rapid eye movement) sleep. Here the treasures of the subconscious are unearthed. You guessed it - dreams [[remove typo]]. During REM your breathing is irregular, your eyes have bursts of movement and your pulse rate rises again. At this point Your body has come comes under a sleep paralysis that relaxes your muscles and ceases motor messages sent by your brain. This is thought to be for preventing involuntary movements that could get your sleeping-self hurt. Some of you You [[usually books talk directly to a single reader at a time]] may have experienced this phenomena, waking to find you are unable to move at all; while experiencing a tingling or electric sensation through your body. Sleep paralysis prevents all your major muscles from moving, thus allowing you to move your dreaming body, while having your physical body perfectly safe and still.

      This first dream period may last a short ten minutes, after which you will go through the sleep cycle over again from stage 2. Fortunately as the night goes on stage three and four vanish, leaving REM periods longer (eventually up to an hour) and the time between them shorter.

      Knowing how the sleep cycle works has many advantages when inducing lucid dreaming. Some techniques will rely on this information, as will be seen on in the related relevant chapters.

      The study of dreams is something that has always challenged the boundaries of human knowledge. It is not easy to study what happens during sleep, science most of it is unconscious since we are unconscious through most of it. Dreaming itself was not scientifically proven until recently. Theses can be made, however, based on the psychological views of dreaming.

      Based on Stephen LaBerge, Ph.D.’s discoveries, it was possible to study the nature and reason behind dreaming.

      In our daily lives, our brain maintains a mental image of our body, an updated set of information, regarding the position we are in, what we see and hear, if we are hungry, and several other data important to our survival. This body image is what allows us to close our eyes, and still know where our arms are placed. During sleep, however, the situation changes: the sensorial sensory input our brain retrieves from our body is so little, that our mind has trouble to work out where we are or what we are doing, correctly. In its desperate struggle to depurate understand our current situation, based on the scarce information it has, our mind will often produce a whole mental conception of the scenario around us. But, since it is based on such ambiguous and limited information, it will often create a wrong scenario around us: a scenario we are not in at the moment. That’s when dreaming starts.

      Being under the effects of Sleep Paralysis, which will prevent prevents any major movement from our muscles, our mind is able to displace the mental image of the body, while our real body is lying still, immobile. For our brain, it is as if we were moving, when in fact, we aren’t moving at all.

      This situation opens up a wide gamma gamut of possibilities. When our mental body image does not correspond to our physical body situation, we start to dream: the world then seen is not the real one, but one designed by our minds. The laws of physics do not limit that world: it will be is a world in which anything we believe is possible. Dreams often carry a sense of freedom: our dream selves are able to do the impossible, from flying without wings to seeing people who are no longer with us.

      Dreams do indeed offer the possibility to do whatever we want, but even though it will be so, they are affected by our beliefs, knowledge and experiences. For an example of that, read the following story:

      John walked down the street. On his way to school, he found a dog. He instantly remembered his own dog: a playful Yorkshire. When he finally got to his school, he met many of his friends.

      Assumptions, be them they conscious or subconscious, ruled the way you interpreted the meaning of that small paragraph. You imagined, highly likely, I expect you imagined that John walked with his legs, and not with his hands. You might have also assumed that the dog John found was walking on the street, and not driving a car. You probably also concluded that John wasn’t accompanied by his dog at the moment he walked to school. Finally, you might have imagined John’s friends as humans, rather than whales.

      This story was used to explain the assumptions you make throughout your existence. Your brain uses those to deduce meaning faster quickly deduce meaning from situations, speech, and text. These assumptions can be conscious or unconscious. It is completely normal for a person to assume a lot from what he or she reads.

      When dealing with dreaming, however, assumptions play an even more important role. Most people would never expect to see a frog watching soap opera on a couch. For that reason, then, chances are they’ll never dream of that. That is explained by your assumptions. In a dream, only things that you believe can happen will happen. This can, though, be pushed by your experiences, such as seeing a talking dog on television, and subconsciously believing it is possible. In those cases, then, In that case dreaming of a talking dog is rather likely.


      The schemas that rule our way of thinking in waking life are also present when dreaming. Everything that happens in a dream happens because your mind expects it to happen. If you believe, for example, that broccoli tastes awful, then it’s highly likely to taste the same in a dream.

      Our beliefs can also be bad, especially for lucid dreaming. In our daily lives, we don’t ever ask ourselves if we are dreaming. That is, of course, because in light of consciousness, we don’t expect to be dreaming. Not expecting to be dreaming will make you believe the same thing when you are indeed in a dream. Your subconscious will carry that belief, making you not question the world around you. For that reason, even the most absurd situations will sound completely usual to us, in a dream: we don’t expect to be dreaming, after all.
      For that matter, there is a type of lucid dream induction that bases exactly on that is based on exactly that. Dreams, as made by our mind, will often contain inaccuracies, rather unlikely or even impossible situations. Even in the most vivid and convincing of the dreams, some things will accuse reveal it as a dream. One example would be a flying dog, or finding your bedroom is now pink (if it wasn’t already). These indicators are called dream signs, for, upon seeing one, one can question whether if he is facing reality, or just experiencing a dream. This kind of realization can make that person lucid, by becoming aware that what he sees is only inside his dreaming mind. It goes without mention that this realization is only possible if you expect you could be in a dream.

      Now that you know how dreams work, you can move on to the first concepts of lucid dreaming. On the next chapter, you will see exactly that: the aspects of a dream, its comparison to reality, and how you can use those to induce lucid dreams. Apart from that, it also includes the main concepts and characteristics of a lucid dream.

      © Copyright 2007 Dreamviews education team. All rights reserved.[/quote]
      Last edited by sourcejedi; 10-06-2007 at 11:23 AM.

    5. #5
      Master of Logic Achievements:
      1 year registered 5000 Hall Points Made Friends on DV Referrer Bronze Veteran First Class
      Kromoh's Avatar
      Join Date
      Feb 2007
      Gender
      Location
      Some rocky planet with water
      Posts
      3,993
      Likes
      86
      LOL I had the greatest laugh when reading this, I can believe I make that many mistakes in a piece if I don't revise it. Someone please call me silly.

      sourcejedi, I have a platonical love for you.

      What I'd change would be the last paragraph:

      ---
      (...)

      Now that you know how dreams work, you can move on to the first concepts of lucid dreaming. On the next chapter, you will see exactly that: the aspects of a dream, its comparison to reality, and how you can use those to induce lucid dreams. Apart from that, it also includes the main concepts and characteristics of a lucid dream. [[removed last sentence, was repetitive and useless]]
      ---


      I'd also love feedback on it: is there anything that needs clarification? Is there anything I forgot to mention?

      bear hugs,
      ~Kromoh

      Saying quantum physics explains cognitive processes is just like saying geology explains jurisprudence.

    6. #6
      ıpǝɾǝɔɹnos
      Join Date
      Mar 2007
      Location
      PNZ
      Posts
      387
      Likes
      0
      Hmm.
      + pro
      - con
      ? what if

      ? Maybe add subheadings. This chapter divides neatly into two - stages of sleep, and the nature of dreams.

      + The stages of sleep section looks very good.

      ? How deep is the *previous* chapter on the history of lucid dreaming going to go into the scientific research? Even the first scientific result, eye-signal verification of lucid dreams, involved using EEG's to see when people were in REM, so is that going to be a problem if we only really explain REM/EEG afterwards?

      I'm not sure about the second half.
      - It says LaBerge's discoveries made it possible to study dreaming, but it doesn't follow up on that - say what discoveries in particular it's talking about and how they made it possible. I'd just get rid of that sentence.
      - I'm not convinced by the "desperate struggle to understand our current situation" explanation. I think it's got the facts right, but it tries too hard to say that this is why/how we start dreaming. I think it should have less "A causes B" and more "A happens then B happens".
      + I like the structure, it makes a lot of sense: 1) dreams happen when our minds detach from our bodies, 2) we make up our own world, anything can happen in it, 3) that world is, however, shaped by our assumptions, 4) we often assume that we're *not* dreaming, which prevents us from becoming lucid in dreams, even if surreal and dreamlike things are happening to us, 5) noticing surreal and dreamlike things is actually a useful technique for becoming lucid
      - I've read ETWOLD, and the use of the word "schema" without further explanation, combined with the use of a short story a few sentences long to illustrate the how we make assumptions, triggers an alarm bell. I've just gone and re-read those parts of ETWOLD, and I don't think there's a genuine problem, mainly because this is much shorter than the passage I'm thinking of in ETWOLD :-). But there's no good reason to use the word "schema" *unless you're going to explain it further*. I think removing the word schema would help to avoid accusations that this is simply copied from ETWOLD.

    7. #7
      Master of Logic Achievements:
      1 year registered 5000 Hall Points Made Friends on DV Referrer Bronze Veteran First Class
      Kromoh's Avatar
      Join Date
      Feb 2007
      Gender
      Location
      Some rocky planet with water
      Posts
      3,993
      Likes
      86
      Quote Originally Posted by sourcejedi View Post
      Hmm.
      + pro
      - con
      ? what if
      ? Maybe add subheadings. This chapter divides neatly into two - stages of sleep, and the nature of dreams.

      I originally thought of subheadings, but then left it for later decision. If we do add subheadings, I'm gonna make an introductory paragraph to the second topic.

      + The stages of sleep section looks very good.

      I agree. The original version by Gestalt has perhaps excessive secondary information. I then used common sense to leave only what's most important.

      ? How deep is the *previous* chapter on the history of lucid dreaming going to go into the scientific research? Even the first scientific result, eye-signal verification of lucid dreams, involved using EEG's to see when people were in REM, so is that going to be a problem if we only really explain REM/EEG afterwards?

      I have no idea about the pervious chapter. I reckon it should describe how the expermient was done, though, but not its results and conclusions (which would be explained in this chapter). I don't know how far the other writers are with their pieces.

      I'm not sure about the second half.
      - It says LaBerge's discoveries made it possible to study dreaming, but it doesn't follow up on that - say what discoveries in particular it's talking about and how they made it possible. I'd just get rid of that sentence.


      - I'm not convinced by the "desperate struggle to understand our current situation" explanation. I think it's got the facts right, but it tries too hard to say that this is why/how we start dreaming. I think it should have less "A causes B" and more "A happens then B happens".

      I'm gonna expand that little sweet sentence.

      + I like the structure, it makes a lot of sense: 1) dreams happen when our minds detach from our bodies, 2) we make up our own world, anything can happen in it, 3) that world is, however, shaped by our assumptions, 4) we often assume that we're *not* dreaming, which prevents us from becoming lucid in dreams, even if surreal and dreamlike things are happening to us, 5) noticing surreal and dreamlike things is actually a useful technique for becoming lucid

      Good to know it is nice and understandable

      - I've read ETWOLD, and the use of the word "schema" without further explanation, combined with the use of a short story a few sentences long to illustrate the how we make assumptions, triggers an alarm bell. I've just gone and re-read those parts of ETWOLD, and I don't think there's a genuine problem, mainly because this is much shorter than the passage I'm thinking of in ETWOLD :-). But there's no good reason to use the word "schema" *unless you're going to explain it further*. I think removing the word schema would help to avoid accusations that this is simply copied from ETWOLD.

      Yes I agree with you on this. Gonna think of something and post it

      --

      I'm going to revise your version myself and change what I've mentioned above. Thanks for the contructive criticism

      ----------
      Chapter 3: The aspects of dreaming

      Before we plunge into the vast study of lucid dreaming it is important to understand some principles of the sleeping cycle, and of dreaming itself. The use of this may not be readily apparent to you, but the knowledge will help in all aspects including dream recall and the timing of various techniques.

      The stages of sleep
      Most dream and sleep research is conducted through the use of an electroencephalogram (EEG). This machine gives off can measure the distinctive rhythms, or waves, of resting neurons. From these waves, different stages of sleep were classified. The sleep cycle, as it is called, has been thoroughly] studied, and as of now many concepts are agreed between scientists. The following is the complete cycle the body goes through approximately every seventy to ninety minutes of sleep.





      In stage one, which means soon after falling asleep, you slip into a state of light unconsciousness which lasts about ten minutes, during which brain activity follows a theta wave pattern. At this time, your brain activity will be akin to a calm and relaxed waking mind.

      In stage two the EEG shows a change from theta waves into the slower beta waves. The body’s functions will progressively slow, though a sleeper can easily be woken by sounds.

      Stage three is the beginning of deep sleep. This stage occurs after about thirty to forty-five minutes of sleep. Brain activity has slowed into a delta wave pattern. It can be hard to wake someone up when he or she is sleeping at this stage; and when it is done, the sleeper might wake up confused and disorientated.

      Soon this will shift into stage four, the deepest sleep. Bodily functions decline in deep physical rest and delta waves are over fifty percent. During this stage, waking up the sleeper may prove extremely hard.

      After stage four ends you will gradually move up the stages, eventually entering stage one emergent, or more commonly known as REM (rapid eye movement) sleep. Here the treasures of the subconscious are unearthed. You guessed it - dreams. During REM your breathing is irregular, your eyes have bursts of movement and your pulse rate rises again. At this point your body comes under a sleep paralysis that relaxes your muscles and ceases motor messages sent by your brain. This is thought to be for preventing involuntary movements that could get your sleeping-self hurt. You may have experienced this phenomena, waking to find you are unable to move at all; while experiencing a tingling or electric sensation through your body. Sleep paralysis prevents all your major muscles from moving, thus allowing you to move your dreaming body, while having your physical body perfectly safe and still.

      This first dream period may last a short ten minutes, after which you will go through the sleep cycle over again from stage 2. Fortunately as the night goes on stage three and four vanish, leaving REM periods longer (eventually up to an hour) and the time between them shorter.

      Knowing how the sleep cycle works has many advantages when inducing lucid dreaming. Some techniques will rely on this information, as will be seen in the respective chapters.

      The nature of dreams

      The study of dreams is something that has always challenged the boundaries of human knowledge. It is not easy to study what happens during sleep, since we are unconscious through most of it. Dreaming itself was not scientifically proven until recently. Theses can be made, however, based on the psychological views of dreaming.

      [[decided to remove the sentence, there was nothign I could add to it that isn't already explained]]
      In our daily lives, our brain maintains a mental image of our body: an updated set of information, regarding the position we are in, what we see and hear, if we are hungry, and several other data important to our survival. This body image is what allows us to close our eyes, and still know where our arms are placed. During sleep, however, the situation changes: the sensory input our brain retrieves from our body is so little, that our mind has trouble to work out where we are or what we are doing, correctly. In its desperate struggle to understand our current situation, Based on the scarce information it has, our mind will often produce a whole mental conception of the scenario around us. But, since it is based on such ambiguous and limited information, it will often create a wrong scenario around us: a scenario we are not in at the moment. That’s when dreaming starts.

      Being under the effects of Sleep Paralysis, which prevents any major movement from our muscles, our mind is able to displace the mental image of the body, while our real body is lying still, immobile. For our brain, it is as if we were moving, when in fact, we aren’t moving at all.

      This situation opens up a wide gamut of possibilities. When our mental body image does not correspond to our physical body position, we start to dream: the world then seen is not the real one, but one designed by our minds. The laws of physics do not limit that world: it is a world in which anything we believe is possible. Dreams often carry a sense of freedom: our dream selves are able to do the impossible, from flying without wings to seeing people who are no longer with us.

      Dreams do indeed offer the possibility to do whatever we want, but even so, they are affected by our beliefs, knowledge and experiences. For an example of that, read the following story:

      John walked down the street. On his way to school, he found a dog. He instantly remembered his own dog: a playful Yorkshire. When he finally got to his school, he met many of his friends.

      Assumptions, be they conscious or subconscious, ruled the way you interpreted the meaning of that small paragraph. I expect you imagined that John walked with his legs, and not with his hands. You might have also assumed that the dog John found was walking on the street, and not driving a car. You probably also concluded that John wasn’t accompanied by his dog at the moment he walked to school. Finally, you might have imagined John’s friends as humans, rather than whales.

      This story was used to explain the assumptions you make throughout your existence. Your brain uses those to quickly deduce meaning from situations, speech, and text. These assumptions can be conscious or unconscious. It is completely normal for a person to assume a lot from what he or she reads.

      When dealing with dreaming, however, assumptions play an even more important role. Most people would never expect to see a frog watching soap opera on a couch. For that reason, then, chances are they’ll never dream of that. That is explained by your assumptions. In a dream, only things that you believe can happen will happen. This can, though, be pushed by your experiences, such as seeing a talking dog on television, and subconsciously believing it is possible. In that case, dreaming of a talking dog is rather likely.


      The schemas laws that rule our way of thinking in waking life are also present when dreaming. Everything that happens in a dream happens because your mind expects it to happen. If you believe, for example, that broccoli tastes awful, then it’s highly likely to taste the same in a dream.

      Our beliefs can also be bad, especially for lucid dreaming. In our daily lives, we don’t ever ask ourselves if we are dreaming. That is, of course, because in light of consciousness, we don’t expect to be dreaming. Not expecting to be dreaming will make you believe the same thing when you are indeed in a dream. Your subconscious will carry that belief, making you not question the world around you. For that reason, even the most absurd situations will sound completely usual to us, in a dream: we don’t expect to be dreaming, after all.
      For that matter, there is a type of lucid dream induction that is based on exactly that. Dreams, as made by our mind, will often contain inaccuracies, rather unlikely or even impossible situations. Even in the most vivid and convincing dreams, some things will reveal it as a dream. One example would be a flying dog, or finding your bedroom is now pink (if it wasn’t already). These indicators are called dream signs, for, upon seeing one, one can question whether if he is facing reality, or just experiencing a dream. This kind of realization can make that person lucid, by becoming aware that what he sees is only inside his dreaming mind. It goes without mention that this realization is only possible if you expect you could be in a dream.

      Now that you know how dreams work, you can move on to the first concepts of lucid dreaming. On the next chapter, you will see exactly that: the aspects of a dream, its comparison to reality, and how you can use those to induce lucid dreams.

      © Copyright 2007 Dreamviews education team. All rights reserved.
      Last edited by Kromoh; 10-07-2007 at 10:01 PM.
      ~Kromoh

      Saying quantum physics explains cognitive processes is just like saying geology explains jurisprudence.

    8. #8
      ıpǝɾǝɔɹnos
      Join Date
      Mar 2007
      Location
      PNZ
      Posts
      387
      Likes
      0
      Here's one I missed earlier:

      Most dream and sleep research is conducted through the use of an electroencephalogram (EEG). This machine gives off can measure the distinctive rhythms, or waves, of resting neurons.

      Your brain is what "gives off" brain waves - EEG's just measure them.

    9. #9
      Master of Logic Achievements:
      1 year registered 5000 Hall Points Made Friends on DV Referrer Bronze Veteran First Class
      Kromoh's Avatar
      Join Date
      Feb 2007
      Gender
      Location
      Some rocky planet with water
      Posts
      3,993
      Likes
      86
      I've edited it on my post, thanks sourcejedi
      ~Kromoh

      Saying quantum physics explains cognitive processes is just like saying geology explains jurisprudence.

    Bookmarks

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •