• Lucid Dreaming - Dream Views




    Results 1 to 9 of 9
    1. #1
      Member
      Join Date
      May 2007
      Gender
      Posts
      635
      Likes
      45

      Tell me about "Depth of Field" in photography

      Hey there. I'm moving, and while going through some old boxes I found a little treat... a Kodak Retinette IA 042. It's been in the family since the 60's (it was produced from 61-63 and my Aunt got it new as a gift) and it has barely been used... it's essentially in new condition. Luckily over the years it's been stored in dry, dust free environment.

      Anyways, to the point. I'm wondering how to get deep or shallow depth of field. I understand that it involved aperture and distance from the subject. I know how to adjust shutter speed, focus, and how to adjust aperture (higher number = smaller opening and vice versa)... but how does that affect DoF? I tried to read the wiki about it but it was all sciency and mathy and stuff... also the article is really long.

      Is there any general rule? Just cut and dry? Like the "Sunny 16" rule?

      Thanks!

    2. #2
      Moderator Achievements:
      Veteran First Class Made lots of Friends on DV Populated Wall Vivid Dream Journal Tagger First Class Referrer Bronze 10000 Hall Points
      anderj101's Avatar
      Join Date
      Sep 2010
      LD Count
      ∞ 0
      Gender
      Location
      USA
      Posts
      2,797
      Likes
      5826
      DJ Entries
      230
      A lower F-stop gives a shorter DOF, as well as increasing distance from and zooming into the subject. I don't know of a particular general rule however.

    3. #3
      Member
      Join Date
      May 2007
      Gender
      Posts
      635
      Likes
      45
      Thanks!

      I just got my film developed today and scanned them into my computer, so I'll show the results. Keep in mind, I'm by no means a photographer let alone a "film photographer". I've been spoiled with auto-everything cameras. This camera's focus mechanism is an "educated guestimation" type thing. But, all considered, I'll post my favorites from this roll. I picked up 3 more rolls 'cause I think I'm in love with this camera. None of the photos are altered. Went from the roll, to 4x6, to scanner, to here. I'm gonna get the guitar and cat blown up to 8x10 or bigger 'cause they're my favorites. Not too shabby for a 50 year old camera.


      -

      -

      -

      -

    4. #4
      Ad absurdum Achievements:
      1 year registered 1000 Hall Points Made lots of Friends on DV Referrer Bronze Veteran First Class
      Spartiate's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jul 2007
      Gender
      Location
      Block 4500-7000
      Posts
      4,825
      Likes
      1113
      I don't think your camera has a built-in meter, I'm curious how you're guessing the exposure times?

    5. #5
      Member
      Join Date
      May 2007
      Gender
      Posts
      635
      Likes
      45
      Quote Originally Posted by Spartiate View Post
      I don't think your camera has a built-in meter
      That's correct. It is 100 percent manual. No 'auto' anything.

      I'm curious how you're guessing the exposure times?
      I guess I have good judgement of distance and lighting. For example, with the cat picture I had the 'focus range' at around 0-4 feet, with a 5.6 for aperture and then I just did 1/125 for shutter speed. For the guitar it was much darker so I did 0-4 foot focus, with a large aperture of 2.8 and a shutter of 1/60. For the tower I did infinity focus, 22 aperture, and 1/250.

      It's not super difficult. For the dark picture of the person in front of the TV I did a 0 focus with a 5.6 aperture and a 1/60 shutter.

      edit: Also, I'm using ISO 400.

      edit2: I just realized that I didn't really answer your question. Basically, a mix of shutter speed and aperture determines exposure. If it's dark I generally choose a slower shutter speed and/or a smaller f-stop... unless I'm going for a specific effect. When there is more light, I do the opposite. It isn't cut and dry though. I can go to both extremes (low shutter speed and low f-stop or vice versa) or have high + low or low +high depending on the effect that I want.
      Last edited by mindwanderer; 05-08-2011 at 01:16 AM.

    6. #6
      ├┼┼┼┼┤
      Join Date
      Jun 2006
      Gender
      Location
      Equestria
      Posts
      6,315
      Likes
      1190
      DJ Entries
      1
      Film photography is amazing. ISO 400 is a great choice, as it usually achieves a good balance between noise and sharpness. Generally I love shooting in the 200-800 range. I use digital cameras, but it's mostly the same.

      I'm quite impressed by your ability to judge shutter speed, aperture and so on, without any real experience with cameras. The photos you posted are great, maybe a little underexposed, but overall good looking. The noise is at the right level, creating that crisp feel that all photographers love about film.

      Is the film you're using very expensive, or is it not that bad? My mom was really into photography when she was young, and found that buying large amounts of raw film and then preparing rolls herself was more economical. She also made some money this way, since she sold film to other people, though this is probably not an option for you. At the same time she also developed her own photos.

      ---------
      Lost count of how many lucid dreams I've had
      ---------

    7. #7
      Member
      Join Date
      May 2007
      Gender
      Posts
      635
      Likes
      45
      I'm quite impressed by your ability to judge shutter speed, aperture and so on, without any real experience with cameras. The photos you posted are great, maybe a little underexposed, but overall good looking.
      Thank you! And they are a little under exposed, especially the ones of the instruments. I have no flash, so I'm working with whatever light I've got I kinda like the orange-ish tint on the 'close-up' of the guitar though.

      Is the film you're using very expensive, or is it not that bad?
      Well the rolls these were taken with were from a small photography shop and I got some of the cheaper film. The 3 rolls that I just filled up (that are yet to be developed) were some fujifilm extra-iso 400... can't remember the exact price. I think $20-25 canadian for 3.

      Also, the scans I have on here are from my crappy $100 scanner and are scans of just 4x6s. So for these next three roles when I get them developed I'll get them scanned onto a dvd at high-res in the photo place (which I didn't even know they did) so that they are higher quality. Then maybe I'll post them here!!

    8. #8
      Veteran of the DV Wars Man of Steel's Avatar
      Join Date
      Mar 2007
      LD Count
      ~35
      Gender
      Location
      Houston, TX
      Posts
      4,553
      Likes
      94
      Give this a look. It's an online depth of field calculator, very handy for learning the basics. Online Depth of Field Calculator

      Your camera has a 2.8/45mm lens, so select 35mm under film, then 45mm under focal length, and work from there.

      Great work so far, by the way!

    9. #9
      ├┼┼┼┼┤
      Join Date
      Jun 2006
      Gender
      Location
      Equestria
      Posts
      6,315
      Likes
      1190
      DJ Entries
      1
      It's a shame that it isn't a single lens camera, that way you could just play around with it and figure out the difference

      ---------
      Lost count of how many lucid dreams I've had
      ---------

    Similar Threads

    1. Replies: 9
      Last Post: 06-23-2012, 02:36 PM
    2. "you" Or "i" In Subliminal Messages/self-hypnosis Recording?
      By Marcus Wong in forum Attaining Lucidity
      Replies: 6
      Last Post: 03-10-2007, 11:27 AM
    3. "waking Life" & "eternal Sunshine Of The Spotless Mind"
      By DreamGhost in forum Entertainment
      Replies: 10
      Last Post: 12-11-2006, 07:57 PM

    Bookmarks

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •