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    Thread: Low Dose Naltrexone promotes Lucid Dreaming

    1. #1
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      Low Dose Naltrexone promotes Lucid Dreaming

      I'm not a fan of Lucid Dreaming but stopped by this forum just to share some information others might find helpful to attain LD states.

      A cancer researcher told me about a protocol for boosting the immune system which has been helpful in combatting cancer, Multiple Sclerosis and other conditions. It involves taking a small dose daily of Naltrexone, a drug that was developed to treat heroin addicts. Naltrexone blocks the opioid receptor sites, so a person taking heroin or synthetic opiates would have no effect from them. A doctor discovered that taking a low dose of the drug before bedtime caused the opioid receptors to be blocked a the pre-dawn time when the body manufactures opioids. Sensing that its opioids are not being effective, the body then tends to create both more opioids as well as more opioid receptors. Because the dosage of the material is quite small, it wears off by the time someone wakes up. The resultant abundance of both opioids and opioid receptors reduces inflammation and may boost the immune system by 300%.

      Wanting to enjoy those health benefits, I started taking Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN) but had to stop because I experienced disturbing dreams and fitful sleep. I then started with an ultra low dose of the material and began slowly building it up toward the optimal dosage range of 3 mg to 4.5 mg per night. Minimal doses reduced the incidence of nightmares, but I did experience a great deal of Lucid Dreams. In fact, the main characterization of the dreams is that I can't tell that I'm dreaming--- they feel like I am having actual experiences, not dreams (even though the dream events may be quite irrational, as dreams often are.) I very often experience the sensation that I am out of my body. I'll find myself outside the bathroom door and I try to turn on the light but I have the sensation of my hand passing through the light switch.

      I'm sure each person's response to Low Dose Naltrexone is different, but I wanted to pass this information along to others in case it might help people jumpstart their Lucid Dreaming skills. Anyone who is interested can Google "Low Dose Naltrexone" and find out all about it. FYI, the drug is quite safe: approved even for use by pregnant women at the full dose of 50 mg daily, so 3 mg to 4.5 mg per day would be ultra-safe. Plus, there's the added benefit of having an enhanced immune system.

      Best regards.
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    2. #2
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      Thanks for sharing, Roarshock. Reading about your experience with the switch I think most LDers would realise they are dreaming - if they are regular RCers. I'll do some Googling...

      Also, can I ask if you're planning on staying around?
      My LDing record, if you want to hear about it, is about 4 WILDs, 1 DEILD, and the rest DILDs.

    3. #3
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      Quote Originally Posted by Bobblehat View Post
      Thanks for sharing, Roarshock. Reading about your experience with the switch I think most LDers would realise they are dreaming - if they are regular RCers. I'll do some Googling...

      Also, can I ask if you're planning on staying around?
      It's funny to find oneself a sudden newbie in a strange realm. I have no idea what "RC" means, nor do I know what WILDs, DEILDs or DILDs are.

      I probably won't stick around much, since at this time, my main concern during sleep these days is getting rest. In the past I've had a few out-of-body experiences, some rather remarkable, but at the moment I'm focused on this-worldly stuff. But that's just me, and this moment. I have infinite respect for inner travelers--- which is what prompted my feeling urged to share my info about Low Dose Naltrexone with your people.
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      This seems promising, I would be willing to try this out, but I have no clue on how to legally get LDN. Any ideas? Heh, I usually buy these kind of things on amazon but this one isn't an option there and I'm not sick enough to warrant a prescription from a doctor.

      Cheers!
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    5. #5
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      A friend got a prescription from an LDN-friendly doctor. That's thirty 50 mg. tablets. I put 50 ml of distilled water in a small bottle (one of those little liquor bottles like they serve on airlines), then I put a single tablet in it and let it dissolve. That yields a suspension where 1 ml = 1 mg of Naltrexone. I use a syringe to withdraw 3 ml of the liquid every day. I get sixteen days' dosages from each tablet that way, so it's super economical. (A bottle with 30 tablets thus yields 480 days of dosages!)

      If you can't find a doctor willing to prescribe it, you can buy it from a pharmacy in Israel without a prescription. It's more expensive, but you could start with one bottle of it to ascertain whether it works for you or not. Here's the web address of that pharmacy:

      *removed*

      I'd suggest with getting the lowest dosage, just to see how it affects you. If it's really helpful with getting you to altered dream states, you could buy more, up the dose----or whatever works best for you.
      Last edited by anderj101; 08-13-2014 at 05:33 AM. Reason: Removed obfuscated link

    6. #6
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      Just a warning to people considering taking this:

      Low Dose Naltrexone – Bogus or Cutting Edge Science?

      This isn't to say it doesn't work, but it's a famous drug known for pseudo-scientific claims when it comes to treatment of many conditions, so caution is advised.
      Last edited by Zoth; 08-13-2014 at 02:03 AM.
      Box77 and gab like this.
      Quote Originally Posted by nito89 View Post
      Quote Originally Posted by zoth00 View Post
      You have to face lucid dreams as cooking:
      Stick it in the microwave and hope for the best?
      MMR (Mental Map Recall)- A whole new way of Recalling and Journaling your dreams
      Trying out MILD? This is how you become skilled at it.

    7. #7
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      Just a warning to people who read the piece referenced in the previous warning: it's a classic example of bias. The author's problem is that the use of Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN) doesn't conform to his perception of how science works. As a result, he concludes that: "The end result is just another bogus treatment with claims that are literally too good to be true, based upon pre-clinical or preliminary evidence only."

      Perhaps from his theoretical point-of-view what he sees is "preliminary evidence" ...but to a person whose condition has been improved dramatically by the use of LDN, the evidence of the efficacy of the treatment is hardly preliminary.

      The author goes on to say, "Meanwhile, the LDN community are turning a promising if preliminary treatment into essentially what is snake oil by promoting it for an implausibly long and contradictory list of indications."

      They are making the classic mistake of extrapolating prematurely from preliminary evidence, and relying heavily on anecdotes. Anecdotes are just another form of preliminary evidence (a particularly weak form at that) that should only be used to indicate promising new research, but not as a basis for clinical claims."

      First of all, the discovery of the remarkable properties of LDN were a direct result of clinical practice: a doctor in New York City observed that his AIDS patients who were also being treated with naltrexone for heroin addiction did not fall prey to the cancers that their non-naltrexone-using peers were dying from. That led to his investigating the phenomenon and concluding that naltrexone in low doses "boosted the immune system." He began treating desperate patients with LDN, and their health outcomes improved dramatically. Because of the safety of the drug, he went on to prescribe it for other conditions and found remarkable improvements in many of them. Most notably, he found that people suffering with Multiple Sclerosis sometimes made significant gains after a single treatment. Literally overnight.

      The author would have you dismiss such events because, as they happened outside the realm of double-blind studies, they are mere "anecdotes." He suggests that such reports of remarkable results should only serve to inspire scientific research. What he fails to understand is that, since naltrexone is long out-of-patent, no pharmaceutical company would commit to the prodigious expense of research, studies and trials on a chemical that can be purchased generically. That such research might benefit humanity is of no meaning to a for-profit corporation, so--- it simply won't be undertaken.

      In the absence of such research, the author would have Low Dose Naltrexone simply go away. He writes:

      "Proponents have turned into proselytizers – saying on their website:

      'If you or someone you know has connections in the media, the medical community, or to those in developing countries involved in AIDS policy or treatment, please let them know about LDN.'

      Truly promising and science-based treatments do not need an organization to promote them. The science will speak for itself."

      Since naltrexone is off-patent and there will, therefore, be no rigorous science to examine its use, websites and organizations of supporters are exactly what's needed to disseminate information. People can decide for themselves whether the information is "truly promising" or not. In fact, since there's no profit motive attached to LDN, the only people who will spread the word about its usage are people who simply would like to help make others aware of a treatment that might possible improve their health circumstances.

      The author refers to LDN as "snake oil" because it supposedly is recommended for a wide range of medical conditions, which is a common feature of bogus treatments. If he had read the literature on Low Dose Naltrexone and understood it, he'd have realized that naltrexone doesn't cure anything. It's a drug that blocks opioid receptors, that's all. By taking it in a low dose, it causes the body to produce an overabundance of both opioid receptors and natural opioids. Evidence has shown that such a condition results in a dramatic improvement in immune function---- and it is the heightened immune system that heals, which is, obviously, what the immune system ~does.~

      Please consider why you're reading about Low Dose Naltrexone here on a website devoted to dreaming. I'm some random guy. I used LDN and observed its effect on dreams, lucid dreams and out-of-body experiences. I stumbled upon this website and thought, "Here's a population whose interest in dreaming suggests that some of their number might benefit from Low Dose Naltrexone. I'll join the website and present what I know. Maybe it'll help some people achieve goals that had eluded them."

      I had nothing to gain by doing that, other than the joy of being of some service to others. I don't sell naltrexone, or own stock in a company that makes generic drugs, or have a website for anybody to join. I simply shared my anecdotal evidence in the hope that someone else might benefit. People who have had improvements in their health outcomes have shared their stories on LDN forums for similar unselfish, altruistic reasons. Don't hold your breath waiting for profit-based science to act in a similarly compassionate way.

    8. #8
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      I will just say that my only interest in this drug is its possible use as a lucid aide and I thank you for bringing it to our attention, especially if it works out for the masses as it did for yourself Roarshock. Anyways, I don't think Zoth was claiming that that article was the end all be all on the issue of the LDN, I think he was just providing this community with another point of view so we wouldn't right away assume this is some kind of miracle drug; its good practice to see both sides i think. Anyways, on this forum the only part that most would be concerned with anyways is its ability to help with Lucid Dreaming.

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