• Lucid Dreaming - Dream Views




    Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
    Results 1 to 25 of 31
    Like Tree12Likes

    Thread: Scientists create thinnest pane of glass ever, and it looks familiar

    1. #1
      LD's this year: ~7 tommo's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jan 2007
      Gender
      Location
      Melbourne
      Posts
      9,202
      Likes
      4986
      DJ Entries
      7

      Scientists create thinnest pane of glass ever, and it looks familiar

      ScienceShot: Two-Dimensional Glass - ScienceNOW



      Researchers have created the world's thinnest pane of glass—and it looks oddly familiar.

      The glass, made of silicon and oxygen, formed accidentally when the scientists were making graphene,
      an atom-thick sheet of carbon, on copper-covered quartz.
      They believe an air leak caused the copper to react with the quartz, which is also made of silicon and oxygen,
      producing a glass layer with the graphene.

      The glass is a mere three atoms thick—the minimum thickness of silica glass—which makes it two-dimensional.

      Although this is the first time such a thin sheet of freestanding glass has been produced, the image above,
      taken with an electron microscope, isn't entirely new.
      Reporting in an upcoming issue of Nano Letters, the team notes that it "strikingly resembles"
      a diagram drawn by a glass theorist attempting to unravel its structure back in 1932 (inset).
      In the ghostly microscope image, two silicon atoms bound together with an oxygen atom appear as white dots,
      with oxygen atoms forming gray connecting lines. This network of random-sized rings is mirrored in the old black and white sketch.
      In addition to demonstrating how graphene makes it possible to produce previously unfeasible 2D-materials,
      ultra-thin glass could be used in semiconductor or graphene transistors.

    2. #2
      Rational Spiritualist DrunkenArse's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 2009
      Gender
      Location
      Da Aina
      Posts
      2,941
      Likes
      1091
      1) no it's not "two dimensional". It's three atoms thick so it would have to have no width or no length to be considered 2-d.
      2) "glass theorist"? That's a funny phrase.
      Puffin and ThePreserver like this.
      Previously PhilosopherStoned

    3. #3
      LD's this year: ~7 tommo's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jan 2007
      Gender
      Location
      Melbourne
      Posts
      9,202
      Likes
      4986
      DJ Entries
      7
      Quote Originally Posted by PhilosopherStoned View Post
      1) no it's not "two dimensional". It's three atoms thick so it would have to have no width or no length to be considered 2-d.
      Yeah, I don't like that term either. But it's being used a lot in science journalism now. Not sure if the actual scientists use it, though. Coz they should know that even 1 atom has form.
      Quote Originally Posted by PhilosopherStoned View Post
      2) "glass theorist"? That's a funny phrase.
      I lol'd at that too Some of the strangest niches in science.

    4. #4
      Oneironaut Achievements:
      1000 Hall Points Veteran First Class
      ThePreserver's Avatar
      Join Date
      Feb 2010
      Gender
      Posts
      1,428
      Likes
      1044
      I wish we could tell that glass theorist that his theory was pretty darn accurate.

      Some of the coolest discoveries are never seen by their theorists, which makes me sad.

    5. #5
      LD's this year: ~7 tommo's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jan 2007
      Gender
      Location
      Melbourne
      Posts
      9,202
      Likes
      4986
      DJ Entries
      7
      IKR....
      It's like I was reading a couple of months ago about how they have now shown how quantum fluids behave, turbulence in the fluids etc.
      Feynman predicted this 50 years ago using just Mathematics lol
      It's absolutely incredibly that anyone could do that and get it exactly right. But very sad that he could never see the proof of how correct he was.
      stormcrow likes this.

    6. #6
      Xei
      UnitedKingdom Xei is offline
      Banned
      Join Date
      Aug 2005
      Posts
      9,984
      Likes
      3082
      Well, quantum mechanics has essentially been finished for approaching a century. Once you know the equations governing something it's unsurprising that you can use them to correctly predict novel phenomena. Indeed the fact that you can do this is one of the main reasons that science is extremely important on a practical level.

      What freaks me out is how physicists predict new particles using only very basic axioms about symmetry. I was talking to some tutor a couple of nights ago, he basically said that they have no idea why it works, it just does and they go with it.
      PhilosopherStoned likes this.

    7. #7
      D.V. Editor-in-Chief Original Poster's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 2006
      LD Count
      Lucid Now
      Gender
      Location
      3D
      Posts
      8,263
      Likes
      4135
      DJ Entries
      11
      Quote Originally Posted by ThePreserver View Post
      I wish we could tell that glass theorist that his theory was pretty darn accurate.

      Some of the coolest discoveries are never seen by their theorists, which makes me sad.
      Progress depends upon those minds.

      Everything works out in the end, sometimes even badly.


    8. #8
      LD's this year: ~7 tommo's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jan 2007
      Gender
      Location
      Melbourne
      Posts
      9,202
      Likes
      4986
      DJ Entries
      7
      Quote Originally Posted by Xei View Post
      Well, quantum mechanics has essentially been finished for approaching a century. Once you know the equations governing something it's unsurprising that you can use them to correctly predict novel phenomena. Indeed the fact that you can do this is one of the main reasons that science is extremely important on a practical level.

      What freaks me out is how physicists predict new particles using only very basic axioms about symmetry. I was talking to some tutor a couple of nights ago, he basically said that they have no idea why it works, it just does and they go with it.
      How did I know that was going to happen
      It's still incredible that it can be done. Predicting something like that exactly.

    9. #9
      Dionysian stormcrow's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 2010
      LD Count
      About 1 a week
      Gender
      Location
      Cirith Ungol
      Posts
      895
      Likes
      482
      DJ Entries
      3
      Quote Originally Posted by Xei View Post
      Well, quantum mechanics has essentially been finished for approaching a century. Once you know the equations governing something it's unsurprising that you can use them to correctly predict novel phenomena. Indeed the fact that you can do this is one of the main reasons that science is extremely important on a practical level.

      What freaks me out is how physicists predict new particles using only very basic axioms about symmetry. I was talking to some tutor a couple of nights ago, he basically said that they have no idea why it works, it just does and they go with it.
      Is it really true that quantum mechanics is complete? I suppose reconciling QM and GR is the only thing left to do. Also are you talking about the E8 model? As far as I knew supersymmetry has not been verified yet, I would be surprised if nature was really as symmetrical as the standard model predicts.

    10. #10
      Rational Spiritualist DrunkenArse's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 2009
      Gender
      Location
      Da Aina
      Posts
      2,941
      Likes
      1091
      E8 is absolutely wrong. Look it up. It predicts particles that don't exist and doesn't predict particles that do.

      Quantum mechanics is a complete theory with all of its postulates worked out. It simply remains to derive all of the consequences of said postulates. The same is not true for quantum field theories. We can't even prove that those models actually exist as consistant mathematical objects.

      And of course QM is ultimately wrong. It just happens to be a very useful model.
      Previously PhilosopherStoned

    11. #11
      Dionysian stormcrow's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 2010
      LD Count
      About 1 a week
      Gender
      Location
      Cirith Ungol
      Posts
      895
      Likes
      482
      DJ Entries
      3
      Quote Originally Posted by PhilosopherStoned View Post
      E8 is absolutely wrong. Look it up. It predicts particles that don't exist and doesn't predict particles that do.

      Quantum mechanics is a complete theory with all of its postulates worked out. It simply remains to derive all of the consequences of said postulates. The same is not true for quantum field theories. We can't even prove that those models actually exist as consistant mathematical objects.

      And of course QM is ultimately wrong. It just happens to be a very useful model.
      I don't know enough math to understand the E8 model. Likewise the standard model predicts the existence of anti-particles, gravitons and the infamous higgs; all of which have not yet been verified. Also I thought Bell's theorem still presented unsolved problems in QM? I'm in my first year of college, I haven't taken a QM class yet, so I only possess a cocktail knowledge of physics; I don't understand the mathematical models like you do. Of course if you have the time, I would like to hear about the details (also articles, books, lectures, etc. would suffice as well).

      I sometimes think that QM is wrong as well. I suppose it is the rationalist side of me refuses to accept that the fundamental scale of the universe is indeterministic. One one hand it could be a cognitive or mathematical limitation that prevents us from, for example, determining a particles position and momentum simultaneously. Yet there is also the possibility that the behavior of subatomic particles really can only be determined probabilistically and the fact that Qm has been consistently verified only adds to the validity of this position. I don't think I understand enough to hold a strong position either way and I don't automatically write off theories that are counter-intuitive like Qm but I have a (unqualified) feeling that QM is just not right. /Ignorance.

    12. #12
      Xei
      UnitedKingdom Xei is offline
      Banned
      Join Date
      Aug 2005
      Posts
      9,984
      Likes
      3082
      Quote Originally Posted by tommo View Post
      How did I know that was going to happen
      What now?

      Quote Originally Posted by stormcrow View Post
      Is it really true that quantum mechanics is complete? I suppose reconciling QM and GR is the only thing left to do. Also are you talking about the E8 model? As far as I knew supersymmetry has not been verified yet, I would be surprised if nature was really as symmetrical as the standard model predicts.
      I don't know anything about specific groups, I just know that predictions of unobservable particles such as the Higgs are just based on such things. I believe the first time this happened was when Dirac predicted the existence of antimatter. It is very bizarre to me that a mathematical model extrapolated from experience of matter successfully predicted something never before seen or conceived of in human history.

      Quote Originally Posted by stormcrow View Post
      I sometimes think that QM is wrong as well. I suppose it is the rationalist side of me refuses to accept that the fundamental scale of the universe is indeterministic. One one hand it could be a cognitive or mathematical limitation that prevents us from, for example, determining a particles position and momentum simultaneously. Yet there is also the possibility that the behavior of subatomic particles really can only be determined probabilistically and the fact that Qm has been consistently verified only adds to the validity of this position. I don't think I understand enough to hold a strong position either way and I don't automatically write off theories that are counter-intuitive like Qm but I have a (unqualified) feeling that QM is just not right. /Ignorance.
      Things like relativity and certainly quantum mechanics do basically destroy the rationalist philosophy. I watched some lectures from Oxford a while back and the lecturer basically said that Hume was massively vindicated by the scientific discoveries which occurred long after his death (Darwin also put humans on a physical level), and that side of Kant's mission was left in tatters. I had always thought that.

      The idea that there could be classical factors working unseen underneath QM is simply a misunderstanding, I'm afraid. I imagine the picture you have in your head is of a radioactive nucleus decaying at a random time, with possibly some unseen mechanism ticking underneath. This is the wrong picture. The crucial experiment for quantum mechanics is the double slit experiment, which, by the definitions of the terms, simply proves that particles are just waves of probability. Look up Feynman's discussion in his famous printed lectures. The empirical evidence is inherently irreconcilable with classical physics.
      Last edited by Xei; 02-10-2012 at 04:54 AM.
      stormcrow likes this.

    13. #13
      LD's this year: ~7 tommo's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jan 2007
      Gender
      Location
      Melbourne
      Posts
      9,202
      Likes
      4986
      DJ Entries
      7
      Quote Originally Posted by Xei View Post
      What now?
      You have an incessant need to say things like "x isn't that great, Y is really awesome"

      Quote Originally Posted by Xei View Post
      It is very bizarre to me that a mathematical model extrapolated from experience of matter successfully predicted something never before seen or conceived of in human history.
      That is basically the exact definition of what I said before. Somehow you think predicting new particles is better.

    14. #14
      Dionysian stormcrow's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 2010
      LD Count
      About 1 a week
      Gender
      Location
      Cirith Ungol
      Posts
      895
      Likes
      482
      DJ Entries
      3
      Quote Originally Posted by Xei View Post
      What now?


      I don't know anything about specific groups, I just know that predictions of unobservable particles such as the Higgs are just based on such things. I believe the first time this happened was when Dirac predicted the existence of antimatter. It is very bizarre to me that a mathematical model extrapolated from experience of matter successfully predicted something never before seen or conceived of in human history.


      Things like relativity and certainly quantum mechanics do basically destroy the rationalist philosophy. I watched some lectures from Oxford a while back and the lecturer basically said that Hume was massively vindicated by the scientific discoveries which occurred long after his death (Darwin also put humans on a physical level), and that side of Kant's mission was left in tatters. I had always thought that.

      The idea that there could be classical factors working unseen underneath QM is simply a misunderstanding, I'm afraid. I imagine the picture you have in your head is of a radioactive nucleus decaying at a random time, with possibly some unseen mechanism ticking underneath. This is the wrong picture. The crucial experiment for quantum mechanics is the double slit experiment, which, by the definitions of the terms, simply proves that particles are just waves of probability. Look up Feynman's discussion in his famous printed lectures. The empirical evidence is inherently irreconcilable with classical physics.
      This is a good point, I didn't take the existence of dark matter into account. We cannot directly observe dark matter but we can observe the affect its mass has on other astronomical objects and light through its gravitational pull. I suppose it is possible that the antiparticles have an affect on the physical universe that we are not aware of at the present moment.

      I am for the most part a strict empiricist (I even hold the contention that math and logic are not a priori but in fact a posteriori) and am not a rationalist but I sometimes have trouble accepting the idea that the universe at its most fundamental scale is indeterministic. Also I would be most interested in watching those lectures if you can still find them.

      Yes apparently Bell's theorem suggests that local hidden variables are incompatible with QM because SR asserts that nothing can travel faster than the speed of light. Have you ever heard of the De Broglie–Bohm interpretation of QM? It is a fundamentally deterministic interpretation of QM. I brought up the Uncertainty Principle earlier; so according to De Broglie-Bohm theory the velocity of a particle is contingent on the position of all of the other particles. I have only just started reading about this so excuse me if I am misrepresenting the theory.

      Have you ever heard of the Quantum Zeno Effect? It has been empirically confirmed and basically suggests that an unstable particle will never decay if it is measured continuously. I am familiar with the double-slit experiment and acknowledge that it is (for now) irreconcilable with relativity. I admire Feynman so Ill check those lectures out. As a matter of fact I just found some good Feynman lectures the other day; dont know if you have seen these already but here ya go:



      There are much, much more lectures by him on the same channel. I don't know if any of these are obsolete though....I would imagine a couple would be.

    15. #15
      Xei
      UnitedKingdom Xei is offline
      Banned
      Join Date
      Aug 2005
      Posts
      9,984
      Likes
      3082
      Quote Originally Posted by tommo View Post
      You have an incessant need to say things like "x isn't that great, Y is really awesome"
      If you say so. I'd really rather discuss the thread instead of myself. Considering I referred to Feynman's achievements in the context of stormcrow's questions a few posts later this doesn't seem very sensible, but whatever.

      That is basically the exact definition of what I said before. Somehow you think predicting new particles is better.
      Maybe you'd like to ask me why, then? Are you actually curious about this discussion or do you just want to ridicule somebody?

      Quote Originally Posted by stormcrow View Post
      This is a good point, I didn't take the existence of dark matter into account. We cannot directly observe dark matter but we can observe the affect its mass has on other astronomical objects and light through its gravitational pull. I suppose it is possible that the antiparticles have an affect on the physical universe that we are not aware of at the present moment.
      I'm not entirely sure what you mean by this... dark matter is not the same as antimatter. Antimatter is not that hard to observe once you know where to look, it has charge.

      I am for the most part a strict empiricist (I even hold the contention that math and logic are not a priori but in fact a posteriori) and am not a rationalist but I sometimes have trouble accepting the idea that the universe at its most fundamental scale is indeterministic. Also I would be most interested in watching those lectures if you can still find them.

      Yes apparently Bell's theorem suggests that local hidden variables are incompatible with QM because SR asserts that nothing can travel faster than the speed of light. Have you ever heard of the De Broglie–Bohm interpretation of QM? It is a fundamentally deterministic interpretation of QM. I brought up the Uncertainty Principle earlier; so according to De Broglie-Bohm theory the velocity of a particle is contingent on the position of all of the other particles. I have only just started reading about this so excuse me if I am misrepresenting the theory.
      I took a look at the Wikipedia article about it, but I don't really understand it very well. It's worth mentioning though that it sounds just as counter intuitive as the mainstream interpretations.

      Have you ever heard of the Quantum Zeno Effect? It has been empirically confirmed and basically suggests that an unstable particle will never decay if it is measured continuously. I am familiar with the double-slit experiment and acknowledge that it is (for now) irreconcilable with relativity. I admire Feynman so Ill check those lectures out. As a matter of fact I just found some good Feynman lectures the other day; dont know if you have seen these already but here ya go:
      Actually it is reconcilable with relativity, that was done by Dirac. What I meant to say was that it's not reconcilable with the traditional paradigm of causality.

      The lectures I'm talking about are a set of books constructed from his lectures, they're called the Feynman Lectures on Physics. The discussion I'm talking about isn't very long, it's at the end of section 1 of volume 3. In fact you should probably just read the whole of section 1.

    16. #16
      LD's this year: ~7 tommo's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jan 2007
      Gender
      Location
      Melbourne
      Posts
      9,202
      Likes
      4986
      DJ Entries
      7
      Quote Originally Posted by Xei View Post
      Maybe you'd like to ask me why, then? Are you actually curious about this discussion or do you just want to ridicule somebody?
      This is so, so grand coming from you.
      Why, then, do you think it is somehow more of an achievement?

    17. #17
      Xei
      UnitedKingdom Xei is offline
      Banned
      Join Date
      Aug 2005
      Posts
      9,984
      Likes
      3082
      I never said it was more of an achievement, I just said that it was surprising. It's quite possible that the work that Feynman did was a more impressive intellectual achievement, it's just that once he had done the mathematics, it was not amazing that reality corresponded to it, because the axioms of that mathematics are chosen precisely because they directly correspond to the real world. With particle physics it is quite different, they are seeing a pattern and extrapolating very greatly from in on the basis of the aesthetic form of the mathematics itself, rather than anything observed.

    18. #18
      Banned
      Join Date
      May 2008
      LD Count
      don't know
      Gender
      Posts
      1,602
      Likes
      1144
      DJ Entries
      17
      It's true that Dirac was greatly motivated by finding beauty and simplicity in equations that described nature. What came as a surprise was that using matrices to describe the total energy of a mass was the only way to do it. It just happened that the matrices had cool looking symmetries implying the anti-matter.

    19. #19
      Dionysian stormcrow's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 2010
      LD Count
      About 1 a week
      Gender
      Location
      Cirith Ungol
      Posts
      895
      Likes
      482
      DJ Entries
      3
      Quote Originally Posted by Xei View Post
      I'm not entirely sure what you mean by this... dark matter is not the same as antimatter. Antimatter is not that hard to observe once you know where to look, it has charge.

      I took a look at the Wikipedia article about it, but I don't really understand it very well. It's worth mentioning though that it sounds just as counter intuitive as the mainstream interpretations.

      Actually it is reconcilable with relativity, that was done by Dirac. What I meant to say was that it's not reconcilable with the traditional paradigm of causality.

      The lectures I'm talking about are a set of books constructed from his lectures, they're called the Feynman Lectures on Physics. The discussion I'm talking about isn't very long, it's at the end of section 1 of volume 3. In fact you should probably just read the whole of section 1.

      Ahh shiiiiii. My blunder, I have been having some trouble distinguishing the two. Haven't we created antimatter like positrons in a lab? I don't understand the Bohmian interpretation very well either. I read Bohm's "Wholeness and the Implicate Order" a while back where he explained it a bit. I didn't really get much from the book, about three chapters in, the equations just frazzled me and I haven't picked it up since.

      From what I have been able to decipher; it is deterministic interpretation of QM that is at odds with the Copenhagen interpretation in that the particle and the wave exist simultaneously and the trajectory of the particle is deterministically guided by the wave function. Basically, the wave function is determined by hidden variables not measurement. It also does away with the need for post-hoc analysis's like the many-worlds interpretation.

      Bohm uses a pretty beautiful analogy, in my opinion, to explain the hidden variables: basically imagine a dancer on a stage with two diagonal spotlights that meet where she is dancing. This creates two shadows; one to the left and one to the right of the dancer. But imagine that we cannot see the dancer, only the shadows. So we see two shadows only which appear to be separate (the particle and the wave) but the hidden variable (the dancer) is what is underlying the whole scenario by uniting the two shadows.

      Needless to say, this theory is not accepted by many modern physicists. Von Neumann said that a deterministic interpretation of QM is mathematically impossible as well as being at odds with actual observations. Bohm's interpretation does seem a bit counter-intuitive yes.

      I haven't heard of Dirac. Ill check him out.

    20. #20
      Rational Spiritualist DrunkenArse's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 2009
      Gender
      Location
      Da Aina
      Posts
      2,941
      Likes
      1091
      Quote Originally Posted by stormcrow View Post
      Likewise the standard model predicts the existence of anti-particles, gravitons and the infamous higgs; all of which have not yet been verified.
      Anti-matter is definitely verified. For example the positron is an electron with a positive charge. Gravitons aren't part of the standard model I don't think. They are definitely part of an attempt to treat gravity as a quantum field. This is fundamentally wrong with respect to general relativity. Gravity is there viewed as just the curvature of space. This requires one to deal with coordinates coming from differentiable transformations of the space into itself. Quantum field theories all work on essentially a flat, static space-time. Or a torus if you just want to play with the math.

      Spurios promises of detection aside, I'm a higgs doubter. I think that it's a symptom of trying to carry out a quantum theory of gravity in a special relativistic model. The trick is to quantize space itself. That's where mass/gravity (artificial distinction) is if we listen to Einstein.

      Also I thought Bell's theorem still presented unsolved problems in QM?
      There are also many relating to quantum information. But this is all operating within the context of a formal mathematical structure. Solving the problems are basically mathematical exercises. Experiments are only necessary to make sure that the mathematical structure continues to predict reality. If there was disagreement with experiment (there is) we would have to build a new structure (quantum field theories, still under construction).

      Quantum states are vectors on the unit sphere in a complex hilbert space (Just like 3-d euclidian space only with complex coordinates and often with infinite dimensions)

      Observables are hermitian operators on this space (their eigenvalues are all real)

      The possible values for that observable (i.e. the numbers that we could measure) are the eigenvalues of that operator

      The state "jumps" to the "eigenstate" (in math, eigenvector) associated with the eigenvalue measured.

      The probability of measuring a given eigenstate is the complex norm (always real) of the projection of the premeasurement state on the given eigenstate. This is why we have to insist that our state-vectors are on the unit sphere. The unit sphere is just the set of states with their norm equal to one. The norm of the vector is just the sum of all its components. So by insisting that our states lay on the unit sphere, we insure a valid probability distribution.

      This is all just linear algebra. You should be eligble in your second year or you can look at susskind's lectures on it where he introduces the math too. If we had TeX, I would gladly write an intro to linear algebra for you but it's a pain in unicode.
      Last edited by PhilosopherStoned; 02-10-2012 at 09:35 PM.
      Previously PhilosopherStoned

    21. #21
      LD's this year: ~7 tommo's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jan 2007
      Gender
      Location
      Melbourne
      Posts
      9,202
      Likes
      4986
      DJ Entries
      7
      Quote Originally Posted by Xei View Post
      I never said it was more of an achievement, I just said that it was surprising. It's quite possible that the work that Feynman did was a more impressive intellectual achievement, it's just that once he had done the mathematics, it was not amazing that reality corresponded to it, because the axioms of that mathematics are chosen precisely because they directly correspond to the real world. With particle physics it is quite different, they are seeing a pattern and extrapolating very greatly from in on the basis of the aesthetic form of the mathematics itself, rather than anything observed.
      Ok, it seems we were just thinking about it differently. Since you're well accustomed to mathematics, probably.
      The way I was thinking about it was that it's a fluid and he perfectly described the way it would move (which is so foreign to pretty much everything we experience in day to day life)
      before anyone had even started to understand how it would behave.

      With the particle physics and predicting new particles, there is the problem that these particles have not actually been verified though, right?
      I'm way out of my depth here, as I've only really read a few publications on it, but no anti-particles or anti-matter has been observed yet.
      If I'm way off on what you're saying here, just say so, there's no reason to discuss these things further if they're unrelated.

    22. #22
      Banned
      Join Date
      May 2008
      LD Count
      don't know
      Gender
      Posts
      1,602
      Likes
      1144
      DJ Entries
      17
      43:00 observe.

    23. #23
      Xei
      UnitedKingdom Xei is offline
      Banned
      Join Date
      Aug 2005
      Posts
      9,984
      Likes
      3082
      48:16 - I know that pub well.

    24. #24
      LD's this year: ~7 tommo's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jan 2007
      Gender
      Location
      Melbourne
      Posts
      9,202
      Likes
      4986
      DJ Entries
      7
      Quote Originally Posted by Wayfaerer View Post
      43:00 observe.
      Nice!

    25. #25
      Rational Spiritualist DrunkenArse's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 2009
      Gender
      Location
      Da Aina
      Posts
      2,941
      Likes
      1091
      Quote Originally Posted by Xei View Post
      48:16 - I know that pub well.
      lucky bastard
      Previously PhilosopherStoned

    Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

    Similar Threads

    1. Familiar Place that isn't familiar?
      By Voidwalker in forum General Lucid Discussion
      Replies: 0
      Last Post: 01-20-2012, 05:19 AM
    2. Does this look familiar?
      By Dannon Oneironaut in forum Senseless Banter
      Replies: 12
      Last Post: 12-18-2010, 11:06 AM
    3. This Will Look Familiar
      By gale in forum Attaining Lucidity
      Replies: 1
      Last Post: 11-09-2006, 10:33 PM
    4. a familiar place
      By shel in forum Attaining Lucidity
      Replies: 1
      Last Post: 03-01-2005, 02:45 PM

    Bookmarks

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •