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    Thread: Steph´s - Hopefully Partly Amazing - Stuff

    1. #51
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      That is bonkers! You could make a killing selling water fountains that did that
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    2. #52
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      Weell - go ahead and construct harmonic spiralling water-fountains then!
      I believe you're right - if you did a good job on design - you could sell it as sci-art - or better make it a best-seller in the garden department.
      If you'd manage to put a captivating esoteric spin on it - Turbo Feng Shui - harmonize your DNA-frequencies by drinking spiralized water or some such - possibilities abound!

      Good luck!

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      I'm on it!
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      This now is soo cute - I confess to having emitted a whole range of enthused exclamations - still do!
      In order to make their captivity breeding bears fit for freedom - all caretakers have to put on panda-costumes - what a job!!!
      Seems the text went through the auto-translator...

      Panda-parenting in Sichuan


      Photographer Amy Vitale, along with a team of PBS and National Geographic Television visited the mountainous Sichuan province, in order to report about the upbringing of pandas, which are about to be released into the wild.
      The panda is still a symbol of China, but at the same time it is a rare species that is on the verge of extinction. Because of the long extermination of these animals and a sharp reduction in the area of ​​their habitat in the world today there are only about 1,600 pandas left. Specialists Environmental years have tried to increase the population of these cute black and white bears. In 2005, scientists at the Wolong National Nature Reserve in China for the sake of the experiment set free young male panda, but he soon died, most likely as a result of a fight with wild pandas. That’s when director Zhang Hemin Reserve, who was nicknamed Papa Panda and his team realized that animals born in captivity do not actually know how to be pandas. Then it was decided to alter the entire program from scratch. Chinese experts have decided that the best way to raise pandas suitable for life in the wild – is to erase all traces of human presence from their world and allow mothers to bring up their offspring on their own.



      Born in captivity panda basket preparing to move out of the building in a breeding center in Sichuan, China.




      14 panda cubs on a blanket in the middle of breeding and research pandas.




      Caretakers in suits trying to lure pandas panda Yun Tao in a box to carry it into another aviary reserve.





      Caretaker in costume panda enclosure. A resident of the cage – in the background.




      Born in captivity, panda eating bamboo in the forest Day Shen, in the province of Sichuan.

    5. #55
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      Oooh - I want a lot of jewellery now!!







      Seems it has no common name - found it on etsy - place called ShopGibberish - they have more models there.

      I want it all, actually!! But I'll try to get Jupiter + 4 moons and maybe one other moon as birthday prezzie! goodsigh2.gif
      Last edited by StephL; 05-05-2014 at 04:25 PM. Reason: well - can't seem to leave it be ..

    6. #56
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      this threads a real trip.
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    7. #57
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      That's what I hope for - makes me very happy, you say that Raswalt!
      smile.gif

    8. #58
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      Still hunting space-jewellery and for the one or other also interested - I found a little shop with even slightly nicer stuff: Chillilimeboutique on etsy.
      It's horribly hard to decide - my husband indeed wants to buy me something like this for my birthday yesterday - but I'm unable to choose!
      This is also great:



      They also have something with different moon-phases - but I like the above pendant better:



      And for Jupiter, my favourite planet - this one?




      Well well - other news - there is a smiley on here now, which bears my name in it: :sleepysteph: - it's coded *sleepysteph*.
      Soo - if you're sitting with your morning coffee and are slightly dishevelled and crumply - think of me and use it!!
      Oh - and surprise Sageous with this one, if you have an opportunity: - his name between ::s.
      Also proud to present another one, I helped bringing on board (*pillowfight*):

      :pillowfight:

      Thank you Ophelia - and loving the giraffe!



      Riight - something amazing is missing in this post - I've got something of the sort to throw in as well:
      Amazing Minuscule Castles Etched on Single Grains of Sand - My Modern Metropolis





      We generally imagine sandcastles as modest estates formed by countless grains of sand. But for artist Vik Muniz and artist/researcher Marcelo Coelho, they thought the opposite. Taking a minuscule sand particle, they etched an entire castle on it. The process took them nearly four years to perfect, but the results are extraordinary. These detailed images (enlarged as photographs) are less than one half millimeter in length.

      Through a series of trial and error, the two used a combination of 19th century techniques and cutting-edge technology. Muniz first created sketches of castles using a camera lucida, an optical superimposition device created in 1807. It relies on a prism to project a reflection of what’s in front of you onto paper. He then sent these drawings to Coelho, who etched them using a Focused Ion Beam (FIB), a machine capable of creating a line that’s only 50 nanometers wide. The FIB’s highly-sensitive levels allowed them reproduce the drawing at a microscopic scale.

      To discover the truth behind these images will blow your mind. "When someone tells you it's a grain of sand, there's a moment where your reality falls apart and you have to reconstruct it. You have to step back and ask what the image is and what it means,” explains Muniz, who is no stranger to these types of awe-inspiring works. We’ve seen him previously construct fascinating images out of garbage.

      The sandcastles are now on view at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art as part of a comprehensive exhibition of Muniz’s work over the last 25 years.

      This is a wonderful video - very philosophical, too:



      One of them says, he aims at recognition - an interesting word in his view, since it means simulating something and then simulating it again. You know it - like what a sand-castle is - and then you know it again - just on a completely different scale.
      He deems, that with computer generated pictures - photography is a bit in the situation, painting was, when the former got invented. In a sense of being released from the natural world and muses onwards.
      Last edited by StephL; 05-07-2014 at 04:11 PM. Reason: bit of what is said in the video ..

    9. #59
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      yw



      I'd like a Neptune ring or pendant. Those are really cool, esp the moon one.
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      "Using ultrasound, a team of Japanese scientists has levitated small particles, and moved them around mid-air."

      Incredible!








      More acoustic levitation:





      Using sound waves to levitate individual droplets of solutions containing pharmaceutical drugs and drying them in mid-air. Why do this? This is useful because most of the drugs on the market are either amorphous or crystalline and the crystalline form doesn’t get absorbed by the body completely. So levitating the solution allows the drug to be made into an amorphous state (by evaporation) because if it were to touch any surface it would simply crystallize. They call this “containerless processing”.

      The frequencies used are just above the audible range at about 22 kilohertz and when the two speakers are aligned they create two sets of sound waves, perfectly interfering with each other creating a phenomenon known as a standing wave. This allows the objects to levitate in areas within the waves known as nodes as the acoustic pressure is enough to cancel the force of gravity.


      Also very cool:


    11. #61
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      Hi StephL!!
      I don't know if it fits your thread (I think it does). I find these computer animations mind blowing and deserve to be mentioned. If I'm not wrong, Lennart Nilsson's micro photography played a very important role in the development of this technique:


    12. #62
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      Lol! At 1:12 it looks like those 2 green things are humping standing up
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    13. #63
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      This fits perfectly in here, Box - thank you!
      What I especially liked was seeing the exchange of lipids between membranes and liposomes - I couldn't quite visualize that as nicely before - it's really good!
      Soo happy I get some help here with trying to amaze folks!



      Being able to visualize better made me think of a story I know and love for quite a while, even if it might not be everybody's thing - tangible mathematics! In my memory it had the shop run out of crocheting hooks because of an invasion of mathematicians - lovely picture - but it's not that far away. About a Latvian mathematician - I have a Latvian friend to whom I showed this years ago without knowing she was from there as well - but he did know her from the art angle!



      It gets a bit more mathematical below but try - it's well written and followable - here the story from: NYT Article on Dr. Daina Taimina

      Some people looking at the crocheted objects on Daina Taimina's kitchen table would see funky modern art. Others would see advanced geometry.
      The curvy creations, made of yarn, are actually both. And they are helping two very different groups - artists and mathematicians - learn more about each other. Increasingly, they are also making a quirky celebrity out of the woman who created them.

      "The forms are amazing," said Binnie B. Fry, the gallery director of the Eleven Eleven Sculpture Space, an art gallery in Washington, where Dr. Taimina's creations are part of a summer exhibition called "Not the Knitting You Know."

      Dr. Taimina, a math researcher at Cornell University, started crocheting the objects so her students could visualize something called hyperbolic space, which is an advanced geometric shape with constant negative curvature. Say what?

      Well, balls and oranges, for example, have constant positive curvature. A flat table has zero curvature. And some things, like ruffled lettuce leaves, sea slugs and cancer cells, have negative curvatures.

      This is not some abstract - or frightening - math lesson. Hyperbolic space is useful to many professionals - engineers, architects and landscapers, among others. So Dr. Taimina expected some attention for her yarn work, especially from math students destined for those professions. But her work has recently drawn interest from crocheting enthusiasts.

      Math professors have been teaching about hyperbolic space for decades, but did not think it was possible to create an exact physical model. In the 1970's, some educators, including Dr. Taimina's husband, David Henderson, a math professor at Cornell, created hyperbolic models, but the first ones, made from paper and cellophane tape, were too fragile to be of much use.

      Though she did not realize it at the time, Dr. Taimina was a good candidate to create a better model. As a precocious child in her native Latvia, she tried her elementary school teacher's patience. When her fellow second graders did not understand a math lesson, she recalled, she would jump up and yell, "I can't stand these idiots," prompting her teacher to send notes home.

      By high school she had settled down, and was most impressed by a teacher who was known to keep his advanced students laughing and engaged. When she became an educator, she decided that no student, regardless of aptitude level, would feel out of place in her classroom. One way she assured that was by using everyday objects to explain theories. (She was known for peering so intently at the oranges at her local grocery to see if she could find perfectly round ones to use in her geometry class that she scared the clerks.)

      But it was her crocheting hobby that would prove really useful and make her something of a star - at least to knitters and math lovers.

      In 1997, while on a camping trip with her husband, she started crocheting a simple chain, believing that it might yield a hyperbolic model that could be handled without losing its original shape. She added stitches in a precise formula, keeping the yarn tight and the stitches small. After many flicks of her crocheting needle, out came a model.

      One professor who had taught hyperbolic space for years saw one and said, "Oh, so that's how they look," Dr. Taimina recalled in an interview at her home here, not far from the Cornell campus. A year after she created the models, she and her husband gave a talk about them to mathematicians at a workshop at Cornell. "The second day, everyone had gone to Jo-Ann fabrics, and had yarn and crochet hooks," said Dr. Taimina. "And these are math professors."

      The crossover to the art world began last year. An official of the Institute for Figuring, an educational organization based in Los Angeles, spotted an article about Dr. Taimina's models in New Scientist magazine and invited her and her husband to California to speak about them. An audience that included artists and movie producers was there. "They told us this helps with their imagination," Dr. Henderson said.

      In February, the two spoke in New York City. To their surprise, the talk, at the Kitchen, a performance space in Chelsea, sold out. Some enthusiasts asked if they were going on tour.

      Gwen Blakley Kinsler, the director of the Crochet Guild of America, believes Dr. Taimina's objects will be of interest to free-form crocheters. "It's always nice to be validated," she said. "People think only grannies do this and it's just doilies."

      She plans to publish an article about Dr. Taimina and her hyperbolic creations in Crochet Fantasy magazine later this year.

      That would be interesting notoriety for someone who, as a child, was told by her teachers not to waste time in art classes. As an adult, when terrified artists started showing up in her math classes to fulfill their degree requirements, she signed up for a watercolor class, thinking, "Then I will know how they feel."

      Now when students tell her they simply cannot understand math, she pulls out one of her paintings and says, "I learned that in three months." Then she might pull out one of her crochet models.

      From here and with actual examples: The Institute For Figuring // Online Exhibit: Hyperbolic Space

      In 1997 Cornell University mathematician Daina Taimina finally worked out how to make a physical model of hyperbolic space that allows us to feel, and to tactilely explore, the properties of this unique geometry. The method she used was crochet.

      Dr Taimina’s inspiration was based on a suggestion that had been put forward in the 1970’s by the geometer William Thurston (also now at Cornell). Noting that one of the qualities of hyperbolic space is that as you move away from a point the space around it expands exponentially, Thurston designed a paper model made up of thin cresent-shaped annuli taped together.

      But Thurston’s model is difficult to make, hard to handle, and inherently fragile. Taimina intuited that the essence of this construction could be implemented with knitting or crochet simply by increasing the number of stitches in each row. As you increase, the surface naturally begins to ruffle and crenellate. Taimina, who grew up in Latvia with a childhood steeped in feminine handicrafts, immediately set about making a model. At first she tried knitting - and you can indeed knit hyperbolic surfaces - but the large number of stitches on the needles quickly becomes unmanageable and Taimina realized that crochet offered the better approach.


      The beauty of Taimina’s method is that many of the intrinsic properties of hyperbolic space now become visible to the eye and can be directly experienced by playing with the models. Geodesics – or straight lines – on the hyperbolic surface can be sewn onto the crochet texture for easy examination. Through the yellow lines in the model below look curved, folding along them demonstrably produces a clean straight line.


      Likewise one can see immediately how the parallel postulate is violated. In the model below there are three straight lines that pass through a point external to a given line (the one at the bottom). All three of the upper lines never intersect the original line. With this physical model in your hands you can fold along each line and verify the untruth of Euclid’s fifth axiom yourself. The power of Taimina’s models resides in bringing abstract mathematics into the realm of tactile experience.


      Another aspect of hyperbolic space that can be experienced with Taimina’s models is the properties of triangles. In school we learn that the angles of a triangle always sum to 180°. That is true on a Euclidean plane, but it is not true on a sphere or on a hyperbolic plane. On a sphere, the interior angles of a triangle always sum to more than 180° (a fact the reader may verify for themselves by drawing on a beach ball or balloon). On a hyperbolic surface the angles of a triangle add to less than 180°. Moreover, the larger the triangle the smaller the angles will be. Until finally when the triangle points are infinitely far apart - making the largest triangle possible - the angles will sum to zero degrees! This Ideal Triangle and its angular oddity can be seen on the model below:


      ...



      The brain is a hyperbolic thing as well of course - and guess what? Female "neuroartists" got the mojo as well:
      Abby Normal? Nope: Psychiatrist knits anatomically correct brain - Scientific American



      The brain is among the body's more intimidating pieces of anatomy, but a child psychiatrist has made it warm and fuzzy — by knitting a copy.

      Karen Norberg, a research instructor in psychiatry at Washington University in St. Louis, spent a year crafting the brain. A "semi-professional artist," Norberg got the idea while working on another knitting project whose ruffles "reminded me of the cerebral cortex," the thinking part of the brain.

      "It appealed to my sense of humor because it seemed so ridiculous and would be an enormously complicated, absurdly ambitious thing to do," Norberg tells ScientificAmerican.com.

      Norberg hasn’t knitted another brain (now housed at Boston's Museum of Science) since completing the project a decade ago. But the wacky sculpture seems to have seasonal appeal, she says, getting media attention in January when crafty folks are thinking about what to knit in the cold weather.

      She spent three months studying neuro-anatomy textbooks before putting her needles to work ("there weren’t any knitting instructions out there," she notes) and nine months with yarn in hand. Her colorful brain isn’t modeled after Abby Normal's (cue "Young Frankenstein") or anyone else's in particular, but Norberg does imagine that it belongs to a woman.

      "It has a robust corpus callosum, reportedly an attribute women have that's superior to men's," she says. The corpus callosum is made up of "white matter" that acts as a communication channel between the brain's right and left hemispheres.

      Norberg says the hardest part was knitting structures deep inside the brain, such as the limbic system, which processes emotions. "The spatial relationships aren’t well illustrated in anatomical drawings or two-dimensional slices," she says.

      Now, like other neuro-inspired artists, she's working on two-dimensional projects, including a patchwork quilt illustrated with the hormones as oxytocin and vasopression, which may be involved in the mediation of social bonding and trust. Another brain-themed artist is Marjorie Taylor of the University of Oregon, who's creating a rug with the image of an fMRI scan, New Scientist noted last month.
      There are very nice and very expensive brain anatomy models from singular parts, like a 3D puzzle, and they are pretty good to understand it - but this is just "mad genius"!

    14. #64
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      What about some "Math Metal"?? \m/,

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      That's great! Yeah - you can't deny it's PHI!!

      What about some help with calculating how far away the horizon is?



      German - but with pictures!


      And I found a really beautifully deep Mandelbrot zoom next door to it - could be a bit sharper, but it's very fast and I liked it lots! Remember - this is not a video created such by an artist - this is just pure mathematics - a formula feeding it's results back into itself! Well - an artist had his hands on it for assigning colours and pointing the zoom - I hope you know what I mean...



      Somebody not going tripping on this sort of stuff? Can't understand you!

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      Hey!! What a good way to practice my German !!

      Edit: I saw once a 'fractal zoom in' made to a shore-like set, to explain that it wouldn't be possible to reach the limit between the water and the ground or something like that, and I was touched, it was amazing!

      Here some 3D



      Last edited by Box77; 07-23-2014 at 02:16 PM.
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      When it's about computer animations, sometimes I find scientific art works that are more than admirable, specially because of they help us to visualize those things that sometimes our little brains don't get to imagine, thinking 1 Billion as it was a thousand for example:



      This one is a mixture of both scientific-based animations and some real footage:

      Last edited by Box77; 07-23-2014 at 03:20 PM.
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      Thanks for these cool videos, Box!!
      And the math metal* is the absolute burner, even "only" as music - husband thinks so, too - says hello and greetings!



      I found something amazing again, I think: A robot with two extra fingers helps you grip stuff | KurzweilAI



      MIT researchers have developed a robot that enhances the grasping motion of the human hand.

      The device, worn around your wrist, works like two extra fingers adjacent to the pinky and thumb.

      A novel control algorithm enables it to move in sync with the wearer’s fingers to grasp objects of various shapes and sizes. Wearing the robot, a user could use one hand to hold the base of a bottle while twisting off its cap with the same hand.

      “This is a completely intuitive and natural way to move your robotic fingers,” says Harry Asada, the Ford Professor of Engineering in MIT’s Department of Mechanical Engineering. “You do not need to command the robot, but simply move your fingers naturally. Then the robotic fingers react and assist your fingers.”

      Ultimately, Asada says, with some training, people may come to perceive the robotic fingers as part of their body — “like a tool you have been using for a long time, you feel the robot as an extension of your hand.” He hopes that the two-fingered robot may assist people with limited dexterity in performing routine household tasks, such as opening jars and lifting heavy objects. He and graduate student Faye Wu presented a paper on the robot this week at the Robotics: Science and Systems conference in Berkeley, Calif.


      Biomechanical synergy




      Left: prototype of the two robotic fingers mounted on the human wrist. Right: grasping experiment of the 7-fingered hand was conducted using a data glove (credit: Harry Asad and Faye Wu)

      The robot, which the researchers have dubbed “supernumerary robotic fingers,” consists of actuators linked together to exert forces as strong as those of human fingers during a grasping motion.

      To develop an algorithm to coordinate the robotic fingers with a human hand, the researchers first looked to the physiology of hand gestures, learning that a hand’s five fingers are highly coordinated.

      While a hand may reach out and grab an orange in a different way than, say, a mug, just two general patterns of motion are used to grasp objects: bringing the fingers together, and twisting them inwards. A grasp of any object can be explained through a combination of these two patterns.

      The researchers hypothesized that a similar “biomechanical synergy” may exist among seven fingers. The tested this and found that every grasp could be explained by a combination of two or three general patterns among all seven fingers.

      The researchers used this information to develop a control algorithm to correlate the postures of the two robotic fingers with those of the five human fingers. The algorithm essentially “teaches” the robot to assume a certain posture that the human expects the robot to take.


      Bringing robots closer to humans



      The 7-fingered hand can perform tasks that would usually require two hands, such as holding up a tablet computer and typing letters on it (credit: Harry Asad and Faye Wu)

      For now, the robot mimics the grasping of a hand, closing in and spreading apart in response to a human’s fingers. But Wu would like to take the robot one step further, controlling not just position, but also force.

      Wu also notes that certain gestures — such as grabbing an apple — may differ slightly from person to person, and ultimately, a robotic aid may have to account for personal grasping preferences. To that end, she envisions developing a library of human and robotic gesture correlations. As a user works with the robot, it could learn to adapt to match his or her preferences, discarding others from the library. She likens this machine learning to that of voice-command systems, like Apple’s Siri.

      “After you’ve been using it for a while, it gets used to your pronunciation so it can tune to your particular accent,” Wu says. “Long-term, our technology can be similar, where the robot can adjust and adapt to you.”

      “This is breaking new ground on the question of how humans and robots interact,” says Matthew Mason, director of the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University, who was not involved in the research. “It is a novel vision, and adds to the many ways that robotics can change our perceptions of ourselves.”

      Down the road, Asada says the robot may also be scaled down to a less bulky form. “Wearable robots are a way to bring the robot closer to our daily life.”



      MIT | Researchers at MIT have developed a device, worn around the wrist, that enhances the grasping motion of the human hand with two robotic fingers. (Video credit: Melanie Gonick/MIT)

      What does that tell me, personally?
      Weell - my inner picture of an alien to meet is not only still green (photosynthesis!) but it gained at least a pair of fingers on each side!



      *I might make a bit of a post on phi et al myself - guys and gals - if you wonder what it is all about - maybe you heard of the the golden ratio? Or of the Fibonacci sequence? How sunflower seeds are arranged in two counter-rotating Fibonacci spirals? Just like the "flower of life" and fractals, Fibonacci is a celebrity when it comes to so called "sacred geometry" - maths for hippies and mind-trippers of various flavours! Just the stuff!! They should do some of that early in school - make maths beautiful and fascinating! I tried this on an eight-year-old lately, who said, she hates everything maths - no doubt in that case, her mother told her, it's something to hate... I was able to amaze her, and and then she wanted more than I had time for!


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      Perhaps some of the links won't work. Anyway, I put a bunch of samples of some molecule jewelry and perhaps you could pick up some to post a better post?





      Caffeine molecule:



      Serotonin:



      Aaaand... a real heart necklace:

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    20. #70
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      Oooh - yes!!
      These are great!

      One more thing on my wishlist - this one is also beautiful - it's an endorphine, each element an amino-acid:



      Should be a bit wider, though - and best worn on a black turtle-neck dress to an endorphine release triggering, elegant festivity!
      I would even like it, if I didn't know what it was at all - and I imagine such jewellery to be a fantastic conversation-opener!

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      I neeed to have these:




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      I found something amazing again!

      Australian artist Andy Thomas creates what he describes as “audio life forms,” specifically 3D animations that respond to audio input. For these latest pieces he used archival bird recordings from the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision (in addition to one of his own recordings) to create these new digital sound sculptures that animate in different ways in reaction to the songs of each bird. Enjoy!





      Would be so great, if one could watch these in 3D pulsating in front of your face...
      He's the one, who also makes these amazing trees, I posted about somewhere - his site: The Artwork of Andy Thomas
      Check the galleries!

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      Is it my browser or the videos cannot be seen directly on the DV page? I must switch to the Vimeo site to see them. Interesting work by the way. I guess it's something related to this sort of visualizers here:

      Last edited by Box77; 09-19-2014 at 06:17 PM.
      StephL likes this.

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      Uups - I'll try sort that out with the videos, but it's weird - here it works. Do you see links or video-player squares which don't work?
      Husband watched the birdsong things and started lecturing me about how many different audio-visual software tools would all be wielded at the same time. Usually they're applied sequentially, like in your video, thank you! Maybe that's what makes them special, makes them look so organic, maybe he did his own programming, too..?



      I quit smoking, but here's something I might have really enjoyed learning to do with my notorious noxious exhausts, set the scenery and shoot! Less artful than these of course:
      Photographer Thomas Herbrich Took 100,000 Smoke Plume Photos Looking for Unexpected Shapes | Colossal and New Quilled Paper Anatomy by Lisa Nilsson | Colossal

      Over the last three months photographer Thomas Herbrich snapped some 100,000 individual photographs of smoke, looking for unexpected anamalies and fortuitous coincidences where familiar shapes emerged. It’s fascinating to see how the brain tries to create order out of chaos, just like looking up at the clouds, suddenly familiar patterns seem to stand out: faces, hands, or scrolls of paper. After carefully sifting through each image Herbrich selected 20 final shots for this series, aptly titled, Smoke. These are a few of our favorites, but you can see the rest here: Thomas Herbrich ? Fotos













      The last before last one is my favourite of these, and I'm still not entirely sure, what it reminds me of. Something medical textbook - maybe embryology or brain stem..?
      And then the last one and the scrolls.



      Edit:
      Hehehee - just noticed that it's under Science and Mathematics, this thread.
      Going a bit art-heavy in here, the me - but I have something which is sort of "borderline" again:
      Anatomical Cross-Sections Made with Quilled Paper by Lisa Nilsson | Colossal and New Quilled Paper Anatomy by Lisa Nilsson | Colossal











      Paper artist Lisa Nilsson recently completed a number of new anatomical pieces using her profoundly incredible skill with quilling, a tedious process where paper is tightly wound into small rolls and then assembled into larger artworks. The natural formation of the paper coupled with Nilsson’s ability to identify the precise materials to mimic organic structures makes each artwork appear uncannily like actual cross-sections of humans and animals. The artist has a number of new works currently on display at the Boston Art Gallery as part of the exhibition Teaching the Body: Artistic Anatomy in the American Academy through March 31, 2013.

      For her Tissue Series, Nilsson constructs anatomical cross sections of the human body using rolled pieces of Japanese mulberry paper, a technique known as quilling or paper filigree. Each piece takes several weeks to assemble and begins with an actual photograph of a lateral or mid-sagittal cross section to which she begins pinning small rolls of paper. Depending on its function she rolls the paper on almost anything small and cylindrical including pins, needles, dowels, and drill bits (she even attempted using some of her husband’s 8mm film editing equipment but to no avail). Lastly she even builds the wooden boxes containing the cross-sections by hand. A graduate of RISD, Nilsson now lives and works in Massachusetts
      I find them gorgeous!!

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      I used to spend long amounts of time staring at the smoke patterns that came out from my incense sticks, staying quieter as possible and putting them next to my lamp--I think I made a couple of pics of it, must dig some graves though . I loved to play with that and see the dispersion of the molecules through the heater air zones, and creating some turbulence by slightly shaking it... I got to understand some thermodynamic laws putting the incense stick up side down, inside an empty perfume bottle now that I remember those days when I didn't know about inducing lucid dreams... If I knew about it back in the days...

      About the videos, it says there was an error while loading the video.. perhaps I have some feature blocked in my browser I guess or I just have to update it... or is it the flashplayer?.. I saw them anyway, I like the most the shorter one... it leaves that taste in the mouth that asks you to see more.
      Last edited by Box77; 09-20-2014 at 06:44 PM.

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